Dr. Kaitlin Campbell

Dr. Kaitlin Campbell

Dr. Kaitlin Campbell

Assistant Professor

Oxendine Science Building, 2240

910.521.6421

About

Kaitlin Campbell is an assistant professor of Invertebrate Zoology and has been at UNCP since 2016. She completed her B.S. and M.S. degrees at The Ohio State University, and achieved her PhD in Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology at Miami University. At UNCP she teaches Environmental Science, Entomology, Pest Management, Invertebrate Zoology, Parasitology, Beekeeping, and Biology Seminar. Many of these courses are Service-Learning courses because community engagement and scientific communication are passions of hers. Her primary research interests include biodiversity, entomology, pollinator ecology, community ecology, restoration ecology, acarology, and agroecology. She is involved in several ongoing, collaborative projects including: 1) the impacts of pollinator gardens and bee houses on pollinator communities (native bees, hoverflies, butterflies), 2) the role of plant diversity and structure on ant biodiversity, 3) effects of fire ants on above and belowground systems, 4) pollination, pest, and disease management in organic crops, and 5) ant-associated mite biodiversity. She is also Co-PI on the Kids in the Garden Grant at the UNCP Campus Garden and Apiary. She welcomes undergraduates who are also interested in researching “the little things that run the world.”

Research Interests

Invertebrate Community Ecology, Conservation, and Diversity

My primary research interests include biodiversity, entomology, pollinator ecology, community ecology, restoration ecology, acarology, and agroecology. I welcome undergraduates who are also interested in researching “the little things that run the world. I am involved in several ongoing, collaborative projects including:

1. The impacts of pollinator gardens and bee houses on pollinator communities (native bees, hoverflies, butterflies)

2. The role of plant diversity and structure on ant biodiversity

3. Effects of fire ants on above and belowground systems

4. Pollination, pest, and disease management in organic crops.

5. Ant-associated mite biodiversity.