Southeast Indian Studies Conference

The purpose of the Southeast Indian Studies Conference is to provide a forum for discussion of the culture, history, art, health and contemporary issues of Native Americans in the Southeast. The conference serves as a critical venue for scholars, students and all persons interested in American Indian Studies in the region.

Seventeenth Annual Southeast Indian Studies Conference
March 31-April 1, 2022
Virtual

Call for Papers & Poster Presentations
Proposals are invited for papers, panels and poster presentations addressing the study of American Indians in the Southeastern United States cultural area. Topics may include academic or creative works on: archaeology, education, history, socio-cultural issues, religion, literature, oral traditions, art, identity, sovereignty, health and other matters. Creative works may include any written, visual, musical, video, digital or other creative production that connects to Southeast Indian peoples’ experiences, histories or concerns. Proposals are welcome from all persons working or doing research in the field. Only complete proposals will receive full consideration. Individuals may submit only one proposal. See page two and three of this document for more details. The proposal deadline is January 24, 2022.

K. Tsianina Lomawaima

Keynote Speaker
K. Tsianina Lomawaima (Mvskoke/Creek Nation descent), scholar of Indigenous studies, is retired from the professoriate where she served as faculty at the University of Washington (1988-1994), the University of Arizona (1994-2014), and Arizona State University (2014-2020). Her research interests include the status of Native people as U.S. citizens and Native nations as Indigenous sovereigns, the role of Native nations in shaping U.S. federalism, Indigenous knowledge systems, and the history of American Indian schooling. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and the National Academy of Education. Her scholarship on the federal off-reservation boarding school system is rooted in the experiences of her father, Curtis Thorpe Carr, a survivor of Chilocco Indian Agricultural School in Oklahoma, where he was enrolled from 1927 to 1935. Books: “To Remain an Indian”: Lessons for democracy from a century of Native American education (2006; with Teresa McCarty); Uneven ground: American Indian sovereignty and federal law (2001; with David E. Wilkins); Away from home: American Indian boarding school experiences (2000; with Margaret Archuleta and Brenda Child); and They called it Prairie Light: The story of Chilocco Indian School (1994).