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Museum of the Southeast American Indian

NASO Officers

For information please call 910.521.6282 or email us at:

Officers

President: Jasmine Jacobs
Vice-President: Francine Cummings
Secretary: Vacant
Treasurer: Summer Jacobs
Historian: Kristen Woodell

Advisors

Stan KnickDr. Stan Knick

Director/Curator
Museum of the Southeast American Indian
Email: stan.knick@uncp.edu

 

 

Becky Goins LevinerBecky Goins

Associate Museum Curator
Museum of the Southeast American Indian
Email: becky.goins@uncp.edu

 

 

 

Return to Native American Student Organization

History of Naso

The Native American Student Organization began in the early 1970s as the Lumbee Student Association. Over the years the name was changed to the American Indian Student Association (mid 1970s - mid 1980s) and eventually became the Native American Student Organization
(mid 1980s – present).

The purpose of the Native American Student Organization at UNCP is to promote pride in our Native American Heritage, explore economic, political and educational opportunities of Native Americans and to promote the unification of Native students on our campus.

One of the visions that the original group had was to see Native American Student Organizations on all North Carolina college campuses, and schools with a significant Native American population, i.e., high schools and elementary schools as well as membership in National Native American student organizations.

Some of the founding members of the organization are Samuel Kerns (1st president of the organization), David Graham, Ed Chavis, Dr. Angela Chavis, Carolyn Locklear, Gail Locklear, Harold Baxley Locklear, Cathy Locklear and Harold Dial.

Other early members were Dr. Curt Locklear Jr, Dr. David Brooks, Christine Jacobs, James Worriox, Numer Locklear, Brawley Graham, Helen Clark, Leverne Locklear, Harry Worriax and Wanda Jacobs.

Group Photo from 1973

From the 1973 Indianhead, Pembroke State University

Standing: Ed Chavis, President; Harry Worriax, Kent Patrick, David Wilkins, David Graham, Von Locklear, Boyce Maynor, Phillip Bell, James Hardin, Keith Locklear, David Oxendine, Harold Dial.

Sitting: Jeannette Moore, Phyllis Jones, Arlene Locklear, Secretary-Treasurer; David Brooks, Fannie Oxendine, Christopher Locklear.
Not Pictured: Levernen Dial, Vice-President.

Note: Information on the history of the Native American Student Organization was provided by Samuel Kerns. If you are a former NASO (LSA, AISA) member and have information you would like to contribute on the history of the organization please contact us.

 

Return to Native American Student Organization

Native American Student Organization

logoStudent Organization began in the early 1970s as the Lumbee Student Association. Over the years the name was changed to the American Indian Student Association (mid 1970s - mid 1980s) and eventually became the Native American Student Organization
(mid 1980s – present).

The purpose of the Native American Student Organization at UNCP is to promote pride in our Native American Heritage, explore economic, political and educational opportunities of Native Americans and to promote the unification of Native students on our campus.

NASO strives to keep our heritage alive through activities and cultural support for all Native American students.

NASO always welcomes new members!

Please come, join NASO, and take pride in the culture and the rich heritage that was and continues to be the foundation of The University of North Carolina at Pembroke.

NASO Links

Group Photo

1956 Lumbee Act

An Act
Relating to the Lumbee Indians of North Carolina

Whereas many Indians now living in Robeson and adjoining counties are descendants of that once large and prosperous tribe which occupied the lands along the Lumbee River at the time of the earliest white settlements in that section; and

Whereas at the time of their contacts with the colonists, these Indians were a well-established and distinctive people living in European-type houses in settled towns and communities, owning slaves and livestock, tilling the soil, and practicing many of the arts and crafts of European civilization; and

Whereas by reason of tribal legend, coupled with a distinctive appearance and manner of speech and the frequent recurrence among them of family names such as Oxendine, Locklear, Chavis, Drinkwater, Bullard, Lowery, Sampson and others, also found on the roster of the earliest English settlements, these Indians may, with considerable show of reason, trace their origin to an admixture of colonial blood with certain coastal tribes of Indians; and

Whereas these people are naturally and understandably proud of their heritage, and desirous of establishing their social status and preserving their racial history: Now, therefore,

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, that the Indians now residing in Robeson and adjoining counties of North Carolina, originally found by the first white settlers on the Lumber River in Robeson County, and claiming joint descent from remnants of early American colonists and certain tribes of Indians

Originally inhabiting the coastal regions of North Carolina, shall, from and after the ratification of this Act, be known and designated as Lumbee Indians of North Carolina and shall continue to enjoy all rights, privileges, and immunities enjoyed by them as citizens of the State of North Carolina and of the United States as they enjoyed before the enactment of this Act, and shall continue to be subject to all the obligations and duties of such citizens under the laws of the State of North Carolina and the United States. Nothing in this Act shall make such Indians eligible for any services performed by the United States for Indians because of their status as Indians, and none of the statutes of the United States which affect Indians because of their status as Indians shall be applicable to the Lumbee Indians.

June 7, 1956

 

Return to Frequently Asked Questions and Links

Frequently Asked Questions and Links

Featured Artist

Gloria Tara Lowery, Lumbee Artist

Gloria Lowery is a retired art teacher with the Public Schools of Robeson County.  Her works have been shown in the Museum of the Southeast American Indian (formerly known as the Native American Resource Center) and across North Carolina in various venues for many years.First Flute

Artist Statement:

“I have always felt a powerful connection with the spiritual world, and have always known that the ancient people of this land continue to walk among us. They are always ready to guide, comfort, and protect us. The Native people of this land share a special link with those ancient spirits, though sometimes their ethereal existence escapes us. However, through my work, the gap usually present between the veil that separates us thins, and I can not only see their familiar images, but hear their happy, joyous voices as they traverse the intangible planes.”

Click Here to see more of Gloria's work.

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