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Police & Public Safety

2009 Daily Activity Report

2009 daily activity report

Microsoft Word (Word) and Adobe Reader (PDF) are required to view and print the report.

August

  • August 27, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • August 28, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • August 29, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • August 30, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • August 31, 2009 (PDF | Word)

September

  • September 01, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 02, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 03, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 04, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 05, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 06, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 07, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 08, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 09, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 10, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 11, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 12, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 13, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 14, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 15, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 16, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 17, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 18, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 19, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 20, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 21, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 22, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 23, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 24, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 25, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 26, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 27, 2009 (PDF | Word)
  • September 30, 2009 (PDF | Word)

October

November

  • November 01,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 02,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 03,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 04,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 05,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 06,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 07,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 08,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 09,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 10,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 11,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 12,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 13,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 14,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 15,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 16,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 17,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 18,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 19,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 20,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 21,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 22,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 23,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 24,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 25,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 26,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 27,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 28,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 29,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • November 30,2009 (PDF|Word)

December

  • December 01,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 02,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 03,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 04,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 05,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 06,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 07,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 08,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 09,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 10,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 11,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 12,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 13,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 14,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 15,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 16,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 17,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 18,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 19,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 20,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 21,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 22,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 23,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 24,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 25,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 26,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 27,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 28,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 29,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 30,2009 (PDF|Word)
  • December 31,2009 (PDF|Word)

January

2011 Daily Activity Report

2011 daily activity report

Microsoft Word (Word) and Adobe Reader (PDF) are required to view and print the report.

January

February

 

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

  • December 01,2011 (PDF | Word)
  • December 02,2011 (PDF | Word)
  • December 03,2011 (PDF | Word)
  • December 04,2011 (PDF | Word)
  • December 05,2011 (PDF | Word)
  • December 06,2011 (PDF | Word)
  • December 07,2011 (PDF | Word)
  • December 08,2011 (PDF| Word)
  • December 09,2011 (PDF | Word)
  • December 10,2011 (PDF| Word)
  • December 11,2011 (PDF | Word)
  • December 12,2011 (PDF | Word)
  • December 13,2011 (PDF | Word)
  • December 14,2011 (PDF | Word)
  • December 15,2011 (PDF | Word)
  • December 16,2011 (PDF | Word)
  • December 17,2011 (PDF | Word)
  • December 18,2011 (PDF | Word)
  • December 19,2011 (PDF | Word)
  • December 20,2011 (PDF | Word)
  • December 21,2011 (PDF | Word)
  • December 22,2011 (PDF | Word)

Suspicious Package or Mail

Note: Although a package could contain a biological, chemical, or explosive agent, the likelihood is remote – experience demonstrates that most are a hoax. It is important to remain diligent and treat suspicious packages and mail with care.

Handle a suspicious item with care – do not shake, bump, open smell, touch or taste.

  • Isolate it immediately
  • Notify Campus Police
    • campus phone 911
    • activate emergency blue light phone

Shelter-in-Place

Shelter-in-Place means selecting a small, interior room if possible, with no or few windows, and taking refuge there. It does not mean sealing off your entire building. If you are told to shelter-in-place, follow the instructions provided.

Why You Might Need to Shelter-in-Place:

Chemical, biological, or radiological contaminants may be released accidentally or intentionally into the environment. Should this occur, information will be provided by University authorities through Brave Alerts. The important thing is for you to follow the instructions of University authorities and know what to do if they advise you to shelter-in-place.

How to Shelter-in-Place

  1. Stop classes or work, or close business operations.
  2. If there are others in the building, provide for their safety by asking them to stay—not leave. When authorities provide directions to shelter-in-place, they want everyone to take those steps now, where they are, and not drive or walk outdoors.
  3. After the initial emergency campus communication information has been conveyed (first half hour), students, staff and visitors may wish to contact relatives to let them know the situation.
  4. Close and lock all windows, exterior doors, and any other openings to the outside. Shut down ventilation fans and air conditioners.
  5. If you are told there is danger of explosion, close the window shades, blinds, or curtains.
  6. Select interior room(s) above the ground floor, with the fewest windows or vents. The room(s) should have adequate space for everyone to be able to sit in. Avoid overcrowding by selecting several rooms if necessary.
  7. Bring everyone into the room(s). Shut and, if possible, lock the door(s).
  8. Keep listening to the radio, television or check the homepage (www.uncp.edu) until you are told all is safe or you are told to evacuate. University and local officials may call for evacuation in specific areas at greatest risk in your community.

Thunderstorms and Lightning

In the United States, lightning kills 300 people and injures 80 on average each year. All thunderstorms produce lightning and all have the potential for danger. Those dangers can include tornadoes, strong winds, hail, wildfires and flash flooding, which is responsible for more fatalities than any other thunderstorm-related hazard.
Lightning's risk to individuals and property is increased because of its unpredictability. It often strikes outside of heavy rain and may occur as far as 10 miles away from any rainfall. Most lightning deaths and injuries occur when people are caught outdoors in the summer months during the afternoon and evening.

Preparing for a Thunderstorm and Lightning

  • Familiarize yourself with the terms that are used to identify a thunderstorm hazard, including understanding the difference between a severe thunderstorm watch and a severe thunderstorm warning.
  • A thunderstorm watch means there is a possibility of a thunderstorm in your area.
  • A thunderstorm warning means a thunderstorm is occurring or will likely occur soon. If you are advised to take shelter so immediately.
  • Get an emergency supply kit. 
  • Remove dead or rotting trees and branches that could fall and cause injury or damage during a severe thunderstorm. 
  • Use the 30/30 lightning safety rule. If you see lightning and you cannot count to 30 before hearing thunder, go indoors. Then stay indoors for 30 minutes after hearing the last clap of thunder.

Have a Thunderstorm Plan

  • If a thunderstorm is likely in your area, postpone outdoor activities.
  • Secure outdoor objects that could blow away or cause damage. 
  • Shutter windows and secure outside doors. If shutters are not available, close window blinds, shades or curtains. 
  • Avoid showering or bathing during a thunderstorm. Plumbing and bathroom fixtures can conduct electricity. 
  • Watch for darkening skies, lightning, increasing winds. 
  • Listen to NOAA Weather Radio for information. 
  • Go quickly inside a home, building or hard top automobile, if possible. 
  • If shelter is not available go to the lowest area nearby and make yourself the smallest target possible but do not lie flat on the ground. 
  • If on open water, get to land and shelter immediately. 
  • Things to avoid include:
    • Tall, isolated tree in an open area.
    • Hilltops, open fields, the beach, a boat on the water, isolated sheds or other small structures in open areas. 
    • Anything metal — tractors, farm equipment, motorcycles, golf carts, golf clubs, and bicycles
      Stay Informed
  • Local authorities may not immediately be able to provide information on what is happening and what you should do. However, you should listen to your battery operated or hand crank NOAA Weather Radio, watch TV, listen to the radio or check the Internet often for official news and instructions as they become available.
  • Do not use electrical items such as computers or television sets as power surges from lightning can cause serious damage. 
  • A corded telephone should only be used in an emergency, but cordless phones and cell phones are safe to use.

Info from http://www.Ready.gov

For more information, please visit our Related Links  section.

Emergency Supply Kit

Tips for Making Your Kit

  • Keep loose items in airtight plastic bags.
  • Gather the kit’s items in easy-to-carry containers or duffel bags. Put them within reach, near the exit you use most often.
  • Check and update your kit at least once a year.

Your Emergency Supply Kit should include 3 to 14 days supply of the following items:

  • The Basics
  • Cooking
  • Personal Supplies
  • Important Documents*
  • Babies
  • Pet Supplies
  • Other Necessities

The Basics

  • Drinking water (1 gallon per person per day)
  • Manual can opener
  • Nonperishable foods*
  • Canned meat, fish, fruit,or vegetables
  • Bread in moisture proof packaging
  • Cookies, candy or dried fruit
  • Canned soups & nonperishable milk
  • Powdered or single serve drinks
  • Cereal or granola bars
  • Packaged ketchup, mustard or mayonnaise
  • Peanut butter and jelly
  • Instant tea or coffee
  • Flashlight (1 per person) *
  • Portable battery powered lanterns
  • Large trash bags (lots of them)
  • Battery operated radio *
  • Extra batteries, including hearing aid batteries
  • First aid kit including aspirin, antibiotic cream
  • Mosquito repellent
  • Sunscreen (45 SPF recommended)
  • Waterproof matches / butane lighter
  • Money *
  • Unscented bleach or water purification tablets (add 8 drops of bleach per gal.)
  • Maps of the area with landmarks on it

Cooking

  • Sterno fuel
  • Portable camp stove or grill w/ utensils
  • Stove fuel, charcoal w/ lighter fluid or propane
  • Disposable eating utensils, plates, cups
  • Napkins and paper towels
  • Aluminum foil
  • Oven mitts

Personal Supplies

  • Prescription medicines (1 month supply and copy of prescriptions) *
  • Feminine hygiene products
  • Toilet paper
  • Entertainment: books, games, toys and magazines *
  • Bedding: pillows, sleeping bag *
  • Change of clothing *
  • Rain ponchos and work gloves
  • Extra eye glasses or contacts      

Important Documents *

  • Insurance documents
  • A list of all your important contacts (family, doctors, insurance agents)
  • Banking information
  • Leases / mortgage
  • Proof of occupancy (such as utility bill) *
  • Photo inventory of your personal belongings *
  • Waterproof container to keep the documents in

Babies

  • Disposable diapers *
  • Formula, food and medication *
  • Bottles and feeding utensils

Pet Supplies

  • Dry and/or canned food
  • ID tags and collars
  • Proof of recent immunizations
  • Water (1/2 gallon per day)
  • Litter box and supplies
  • Carrying container

Other Necessities

  • Tool box
  • ABC rated fire extinguisher
  • Masking tape or duct tape
  • Outdoor extension cords
  • Spray paint
  • Standard single line phone (that does not require electricity)
  • Local phone book
  • Roofing tarps or plastic sheeting

* If you are planning to evacuate to a Red Cross Evacuation Center, please be sure to take these items.

For more information, please visit our Related Links section.

Floods

Flooding is the nation's most common natural disaster. Flooding can happen in every U.S. state and territory. However, all floods are not alike. Some can develop slowly during an extended period of rain, or in a warming trend following a heavy snow. Others, such as flash floods, can occur quickly, even without any visible signs of rain. Be prepared for flooding no matter where you live, but particularly if you are in a low-lying area, near water or downstream from a dam. Even a very small stream or dry creek bed can overflow and create flooding.

  • Prepare for Flooding
  • Plan to Evacuate
  • Stay Informed

Prepare for Flooding

  • Elevate the furnace, water heater, and electric panel in your home if you live in an area that has a high flood risk. 
  • Consider installing "check valves" to prevent flood water from backing up into the drains of your home. 
  • If feasible, construct barriers to stop floodwater from entering the building and seal walls in basements with waterproofing compounds. 
  • Property insurance does not typically cover flood damage. Talk to your insurance provider about your policy and consider if you need additional coverage. 
  • Get a kit of emergency supplies and prepare a portable kit in case you have to evacuate. 
  • Familiarize yourself with the terms that are used to identify a thunderstorm hazard, including understanding the difference between a severe thunderstorm watch and a severe thunderstorm warning. 
    • A flood watch or flash flood watch means there is a possibility of flooding or a flash flood in your area. 
    • Be prepared to evacuate. 
    • If time allows, bring in outside furniture and move your valuables to higher places in your home. 
    • Unplug electrical appliances, moving them to higher levels, if possible. However, do not touch an electric appliance if you are wet or standing in water. 
    • If you have a car, fill the gas tank in case you have to evacuate. 
    • A flood warning means a flood is occurring or will likely occur soon. If you are advised to evacuate do so immediately. 
    • A flash flood warning means a flash flood is occurring. Seek higher ground immediately; do not wait for instructions.

Plan to Evacuate  

  • Plan how you will leave and where you will go if you are advised to evacuate. 
  • If you do not have a car, plan alternate means of evacuating. 
  • Plan places where your family will meet, both within and outside of your immediate neighborhood. 
  • Identify several places you could go in an emergency, a friend's home in another town, a motel or public shelter. 
  • If you have a car, keep a half tank of gas in it at all times in case you need to evacuate. 
  • Become familiar with alternate routes and other means of transportation out of your area.
  • Take your emergency supply kit
  • Listen to NOAA Weather Radio for information. 
  • Do not walk through moving water, if possible. Look for areas where the water is not moving. What might seem like a small amount of moving water can easily knock you down. 
  • Do not drive into flooded areas. If your vehicle becomes surrounded by rising water, get out quickly and move to higher ground, if possible.

Stay Informed    

  • Local authorities may not immediately be able to provide information on what is happening and what you should do. However, you should listen to NOAA Weather Radio, watch TV, listen to the radio or check the Internet often for official news and instructions as they become available.
  • If it has been raining hard for several hours or if it has been raining steadily for days there may be the potential for flooding. Use common sense and available information. If water is rising quickly or you see a moving wall of mud or debris, immediately move to higher ground.
  • Stay out of flood waters, if possible. The water may be contaminated or electrically charged. However, should you find yourself trapped in your vehicle in rising water get out immediately and seek higher ground.
  • Stay away from downed power lines to avoid the risk of electric shock or electrocution. 
  • Do not return to your home until local authorities say it is safe. Even after flood waters recede, roads may be weakened and could collapse. Buildings may be unstable, and drinking water may be contaminated. Use common sense and exercise caution.
  • Info from http://www.Ready.gov

For more information, please visit our Related Links section

Tornadoes

Tornadoes are one of nature's most violent storms. They can appear suddenly without warning and can be invisible until dust and debris are picked up or a funnel cloud appears. Planning and practicing specifically how and where you take shelter is a matter of survival. Be prepared to act quickly. Keep in mind that while tornadoes are more common in the Midwest, Southeast and Southwest, they can occur in any state and at any time of the year, making advance preparation important.

Prepare for a Tornado

  • Familiarize yourself with the terms that are used to identify a tornado hazard. 
    •  A tornado watch means a tornado is possible in your area. You should monitor local radio and television news outlets for the latest developments. 
    • A tornado warning is when a tornado is actually occurring, take shelter immediately.
  • Determine in advance where you will take shelter in case of a tornado warning. 
    • Storm cellars or basements provide the best protection. 
    • If underground shelter is not available, go into an interior room or hallway on the lowest floor possible. 
    • In a high-rise building, go to a small interior room or hallway on the lowest floor possible. 
    • Stay away from windows, doors and outside walls. Go to the center of the room. Stay away from corners because they attract debris. 
    • A vehicle, trailer or mobile home does not provide good protection. Plan to go quickly to a building with a strong foundation, if possible. 
    • If shelter is not available, lie flat in a ditch or other low-lying area. Do not get under an overpass or bridge. You are safer in a low, flat location. 
    • Plan to stay in the shelter location until the danger has passed. 
  • Get a kit of emergency supplies. Store it in your shelter location.

Plan to Take Shelter

  • If local authorities issue a tornado warning or if you see a funnel cloud. Take shelter immediately. 
  • Local authorities may not immediately be able to provide information on what is happening and what you should do. However, you should watch TV, listen to the radio or check the Internet often for official news and instructions as they become available. 
  • Stay in the shelter location until the danger has passed.

Stay Informed

Familiarize yourself with the terms that are used to identify a tornado hazard.

  • A tornado watch means a tornado is possible in your area.
  • A tornado warning is when a tornado is actually occurring, take shelter immediately.

Listen to Local Officials

Learn about the emergency plans that have been established in your area by your state and local government. In any emergency, always listen to the instructions given by local emergency management officials.

For further information on how to plan and prepare for tornadoes as well as what to do during and after a tornado, visit: Federal Emergency Management Agency, NOAA Watch or American Red Cross.

  • After a tornado be sure to remain out of damaged buildings and stay clear of downed power lines.
  • Help injured or trapped people. Check on others who may require special assistance, such as the elderly, children and people with disabilities.
  • Local authorities may not immediately be able to provide information on what is happening and what you should do. However, you should watch tv, listen to the radio or check the Internet often for official news and instructions as they become available.
  • Info from http://www.Ready.gov-

For more information, please visit our Related Links section.

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