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American Indian Studies

News & Events

Upcoming Events

  • April 12-13, 2018: Fourteenth Annual Southeast Indian Studies Conference
  • November 8, 2018: 10th Annual Honoring Native Foodways 11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. University Center Annex
    Honoring Native Foodways has four central goals: to celebrate Native American Heritage Month in November; to help UNCP students, faculty and staff honor, understand, and sample foods that are indigenous to the Americas; to emphasize healthy foods that have been part of traditional Indigenous diets for centuries, and which can still be easily prepared today; and to cultivate campus and community collegiality through that experience we all enjoy: eating!  Honoring Native Foodways invites the campus and local communities to this free public event. American Indian Foodways and Recipes booklet

AIS News

  • 2016: Dr. Mary Ann Jacobs edited American Indian Women of Proud Nations: Essays on History, Language and Education (Peter Lang, 2015) with Dr. Cherry Beasley and Dr. Ulrike Wiethaus. This multidisciplinary collection of nine previously unpublished essays presents new research in three interlocking domains: tribal history with a special emphasis on Native women in the Southeast, language revitalization efforts and the narrative knowledge inherent in indigenous oral culture, and traditional educational systems in the context of the ongoing colonization of American Indian educational practices and values. This volume highlights Southeastern Indian issues and demonstrates the unique situation of women in tribes lacking (full) federal recognition or a more inclusive and multidisciplinary discussion of Native women in more than one tribal nation. Southeastern themes are linked with topics of concern by other tribal nations to show commonalities and raised awareness about the central experiences and contributions of Native women in the encounter and ongoing struggle with Euro-American systems of oppression and cultural erasure.
  • May 19, 2016: Distinguished alumni Drs. Waltz and Louise Maynor pledge $50,000 to American Indian Studies Department
  • Subscribe to AIS news Listserv

Past Events

 

Resources

Campus Resources

The Museum of the Southeast American Indian (formerly The Native American Resource Center) (web site)

Located on the first floor of Old Main, the NARC offers a rich collection of authentic American Indian artifacts, handicrafts, art, books, cassettes, record albums, and filmstrips about the Native Americans, with emphasis on the Lumbee Indians of Robeson County. An exciting variety of exhibits is on display, including prehistoric tools and weapons, 19th century Lumbee household and farm equipment, and contemporary Indian art. Indian cultures from all sections of the United States, Canada, Central America, and South America are represented by characteristic artifacts.

Student Organizations

  • Alpha Pi Omega (American Indian Sorority)
  • American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES)
  • Native American Student Organization (NASO)
  • Phi Sigma Nu (American Indian Fraternity)
  • Sigma Omicron Epsilon (American Indian Sorority)

American Indian Education Resources

Publications & Presentations

Faculty

Dr. Mary Ann Jacobs

2016: Edited American Indian Women of Proud Nations: Essays on History, Language and Education (Peter Lang, 2015) with Dr. Cherry Beasley and Dr. Ulrike Wiethaus. This multidisciplinary collection of nine previously unpublished essays presents new research in three interlocking domains: tribal history with a special emphasis on Native women in the Southeast, language revitalization efforts and the narrative knowledge inherent in indigenous oral culture, and traditional educational systems in the context of the ongoing colonization of American Indian educational practices and values. This volume highlights Southeastern Indian issues and demonstrates the unique situation of women in tribes lacking (full) federal recognition or a more inclusive and multidisciplinary discussion of Native women in more than one tribal nation. Southeastern themes are linked with topics of concern by other tribal nations to show commonalities and raised awareness about the central experiences and contributions of Native women in the encounter and ongoing struggle with Euro-American systems of oppression and cultural erasure.

Dr. Jane Haladay

April, 2015: Wins award for best scholarly publication at the 2015 Native American Literature Symposium. Dr. Haladay won the Beatrice Medicine Award for best critical essay of the year on Native American literature, given by the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies at Brigham Young University. The article is titled "Keeping It Real: Simon Ortiz Resists 'The San Francisco Indians,'" published in Wicazo Sa Review, Volume 29, Number 2, Fall 2014, pp. 5-24.

Dr. Jay Hansford C. Vest

Books:

December, 2014: "Native American Oralcy: Interpretations of Indigenous Thought" (Vernon, BC: JCharlton Publishing, 2014). Native American Oralcy: Interpretations of Indigenous Thought is a work of criticism designed to challenge the misadventures of modernity in its divorce from the organic world.  Engaging Native American / First Nations oral traditions as they embrace an paradigm of thought that engenders accord with nature, this study challenges the creeping ideological abstractions that ensue with the mind-over-matter mentality of the Western literary paradigm.  It is an insight into the once and future wisdom essential to earth care. http://www.jcharltonpublishing.com/native-american-oralcy.html

Peer Reviewed/Refereed Journal Articles:

2017: de Rus Jacquet, Aurélie, Michael Timmers, Sin Ying Ma, Andrew Thieme, George P. McCabe, Jay Hansford C. Vest, Mary Ann Lila, and Jean-Christophe Rochet. "Lumbee traditional medicine: Neuroprotective activities of medicinal plants used to treat Parkinson's disease-related symptoms." Journal of Ethnopharmacology (2017).

2017: de Rus Jacquet, Aurélie, Mitali Arun Tambe, Sin Ying Ma, George P. McCabe, Jay Hansford C. Vest, and Jean-Christophe Rochet. "Pikuni-Blackfeet traditional medicine: Neuroprotective activities of medicinal plants used to treat Parkinson’s disease-related symptoms." Journal of Ethnopharmacology (2017).

December, 2015: Will-of-the-Land and Indigenous Thought: Wilderness, Chaos Piikani Mythology, and the Blackfeet Water Mysteries,” The Cultural and Literary Nationalism of Fourth World Literatures, an International Peer Reviewed Journal, v. 2, n. 1 (December 2015), 20-26.

2015: “Orality and Soatsaki (Feather Woman): Magical Realism in James Welch’s Fools Crow,” The Cultural and Literary Nationalism of Fourth World Literatures, an International Peer Reviewed Journal, v. 1, n. 1 (January 2015), 9-19.  https://jlfourthworldlitt.com

Conference Proceedings:

2015: "Who is an Indian?: Perspectives on Native American Identity,” Lemuel Berry, Jr., editor  (Scarborough, ME: NAAAS & Affiliates, 2015 Annual Monograph, 2015).

 

 

Faculty & Staff

Dr. Mary Ann Jacobs
Dr. Mary Ann Jacobs (Lumbee)

Chair and Associate Professor
Email: mary.jacobs@uncp.edu
Phone: 910.775.4262
Office: Old Main, Room 251

Office Hours: Fall 2017 M 10:00–11:00; WF 10:00–12:00; and by appointment

Alesia Cummings
Alesia J. Cummings (Lumbee)

Administrative Support Associate and Web Information Coordinator 
Email: alesia.cummings@uncp.edu
Phone: 910.521.6266
Office: Old Main, Room 207

Jane HaladayDr. Jane HaladaySafe Zone Safe Zone image

Professor 
Email: haladayj@uncp.edu
Phone: 910.521.6485
Office: Old Main, Room 203
Office Hours: Fall 2017 MWF 12:30-1:15 & 2:30-3:00; and by appointment

Dr. Jamie M. Mize

Dr. Jamie M. Mize

Assistant Professor, History
Email: jamie.mize@uncp.edu
Phone: 910.521.6440
Office: Dial Humanities Building, Room 206
Office Hours: Fall 2017 MW 10:00-11:30 & TR 11:00-12:00; and by appointment

Linda Oxendine
Dr. Linda E. Oxendine (Lumbee)

Professor Emeritus
Email: linda.oxendine@uncp.edu

 

Michael Spivey
Dr. Michael Spivey

Associate Professor, Sociology and Criminal Justice
Email: michael.spivey@uncp.edu
Phone: 910.521.6776
Office: Sampson, Room 210
Office Hours:  Fall 2017 TBA

Jay Vest
Dr. Jay Hansford C. Vest (Monacan)

Professor
Email: jay.vest@uncp.edu
Phone: 910.521.6895
Office: Old Main, Room 225
Web Site: www.uncp.edu/home/vestj/                   

Office Hours: Fall 2017 TR 2:00-4:00; W 1:00-4:00; and by appointment

Dr. Christopher Woolley

 Dr. Christopher Woolley

Assistant Professor, History
Email: christopher.woolley@uncp.edu
Phone: 910.521.6317
Office: Dial Humanities Building, Room 210
Office Hours: Fall 2017 T 2:00-5:00 and R 9:00-11:00

 

Adjunct Instructors

Dr. Danielle Hiraldo
Dr. Danielle Hiraldo (Lumbee)

Assistant Professor
Email: danielle.hiraldo@uncp.edu
Office Hours: On-line

 

Maria Warren
Maria Warren, Esq.

Lecturer
Email: maria.warren@uncp.edu
Office Hours: On-line

 

 Safe Zone imageThis image denotes Safe Zone Education.

Scholarships

 

American Indian Studies Scholarship Recipients 2017

 Adolph L. Dial Endowed Scholarship

Jessica R. Markey

Jane C. Oxendine Endowed Scholarship

Tonya E. Locklear, Beverly C. Hall

Thomas Oxendine Endowed scholarship

Alexis K. Baril

Dr. Helen Maynor Scheirbeck Endowed Scholarship

Berri N. Locklear, Jessica R. Markey, Alexis K. Baril

Jim Thorpe Scholarship

Marissa D. Chavis


American Indian Studies
Scholarship Recipients 2016

 Adolph L. Dial Endowed Scholarship

Berri N. Locklear, Jessica R. Markey

Jane C. Oxendine Endowed Scholarship

Tonya E. Locklear

Thomas Oxendine Endowed scholarship

Berri N. Locklear, Jessica R. Markey

Dr. Helen Maynor Scheirbeck Endowed Scholarship

Berri N. Locklear, Jessica R. Markey

Jim Thorpe Scholarship

Berri N. Locklear, Jessica R. Markey

 


 Please contact the department for requirements and application information on any of the following scholarships.

Adolph L. Dial Endowed Scholarship

This scholarship was established by Dr. Adolph Dial, the first chairman of the American Indian Studies Department at UNC Pembroke. The award is made annually to a student majoring in American Indian Studies.

Jane C. Oxendine Endowed Scholarship

The Jane Oxendine scholarship was established by the Pembroke Chapter of the UNCP Alumni Association in recognition of Mrs. Oxendine’s dedication to the preservation of the American Indian culture. The recipient must have a major or minor in American Indian Studies. The recipient shall be enrolled in good standing at the University and be in need of financial assistance. The recipient must be actively involved in cultural activities on and off campus.

Thomas Oxendine Endowed Scholarship

The Thomas Oxendine Endowed Scholarship is established by family and friends to honor his distinguished military service and life contributions to American Indian people. The family’s intent is to establish an award which will affirm and promote their belief in the enduring value of education with an appreciation for the academic discipline of American Indian Studies. The donor will commemorate the memory and legacy of the late Thomas Oxendine, who was the nation’s first American Indian Navy fighter pilot. Thomas, a highly decorated officer who fought in WWII and in the Korean and Vietnam Wars served his country with distinction. This endowed scholarship is meant to encourage and inspire recipients to recognize the importance and relativity of American Indian’s contribution to this country. The donor believes that education is a means of broadening one’s horizons, not only in the pursuit of a career but also in the quest to serve all humanity.

Candidates qualified for this scholarship award shall be an American Indian Studies major pursuing an undergraduate degree at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke. Recipients are required to maintain a 3.0 GPA and must be a sophomore or above in order to qualify for the scholarship. The Department Chair shall establish a committee to determine the recipient that is most deserving based on the criteria stipulated. The award will be made annually.

William Lonnie Revels, Sr. Memorial Scholarship*

The Donor wishes to establish this scholarship—a tribute to her husband’s lifelong commitment to education, entrepreneurship, and his American Indian heritage—to encourage and financially assist young American Indian students pursuing an education at UNC Pembroke.

The recipients of the William Lonnie Revels, Sr. Memorial Scholarship shall be native residents of North Carolina majoring in American Indian Studies, Education, or Business at UNCP. The awards should rotate within these majors—the first year awarded to an American Indian Studies major, the second year to an Education major, the third year to a Business major with a Concentration in Entrepreneurship, etc. Recipients must maintain a 2.5 QPA and be full-time undergraduate students in any year of study. The award will be made to an American Indian student of demonstrated financial need in the fall and is non-renewable.

Dr. Helen Maynor Scheirbeck Endowed Scholarship*  

The Helen Maynor Scheirbeck Endowed Scholarship is established by family and friends to honor Helen’s distinguished service and lifelong contributions to American Indian people and, in particular, to the Lumbee Tribe of which she was a member. The intent of this scholarship is to establish an award which will affirm and promote Helen’s belief in the enduring value of education; and to commemorate the memory and legacy of one who dedicated her life to the advancement and advocacy of American Indian justice and her appreciation for the academic discipline of American Indian Studies.

This endowed scholarship is meant to encourage and inspire recipients to recognize the relevance and the importance of the contributions of American Indians to this country and the belief that education is a means of broadening horizons, pursuing a meaningful career, and advancing the quest to serve all humanity. 

Candidates for this scholarship: shall be American Indian Studies majors pursuing an undergraduate degree at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke; must maintain a 3.0 GPA; must be a sophomore, junior or senior; and, must be of demonstrated financial need. Recipients shall be of American Indian descent and enrolled in a State of North Carolina or Federally recognized tribe. Recipients must have residential status from one of the following counties: Robeson, Cumberland, Scotland, or Hoke. If there should be no qualified American Indian candidates, the scholarship should be awarded to an American Indian Studies major.

Jim Thorpe Scholarship

This scholarship was established by UNCP professor and Thorpe scholar Dr. Robert Reising to reward a deserving student as well as to honor “the Greatest Athlete in the World.” Jim Thorpe, a Sac and Fox Indian, Olympic and professional athlete, was a one-time resident of North Carolina. Criteria for award of this scholarship include a demonstrated financial need, full-time undergraduate student status, and, preferably, majoring in American Indian Studies. One scholarship will be awarded in the fall of the year. The scholarship is renewable.

Note: * indicates geographically restricted scholarships

Additional American Indian Scholarships

Additional UNCP Scholarships

 

Courses

Listed below are courses offered through American Indian Studies. For a more detailed course description, visit the UNCP catalog.

Departmental (AIS)

  • AIS 1010. Introduction to American Indian Studies (Service-Learning)
  • AIS 2010. American Indian Cultures
  • AIS 2390. American Indian Education
  • AIS 3400. American Indians and Film
  • AIS 3600. History and Culture of the Lumbee
  • AIS 3950. Archaeology in North Carolina
  • AIS 4020. Federal Policy and the American Indian
  • AIS 4040. Field Methods in Archaeology
  • AIS 4050. Contemporary Issues of American Indians
  • AIS 4520. Meso-America Before European Contact
  • AIS 4600. American Indian Health
  • AIS 4990. Independent Study in American Indian Studies
  • AISS 2XXX. Special Topics in American Indian Studies
  • AISS 4XXX. Special Topics in American Indian Studies

Art

  • AIS 2170. North American Indian Art History (ART 2170)

Education

  • AIS 2310. Race, Culture, and the Lumbee Experience (EDN 2310)

Literature

  • AIS 2200. Native American Literature (ENG 2200) (Service Learning and Writing Enriched)
  • AIS 2410. Environmental Literature (ENG 2410)
  • AIS 3440. The Native American Novel (ENG 3440)
  • AIS 3470. Native American Poetry (ENG 3470)
  • AIS 4500. Seminar in Native American Literature (ENG 4500)

History

  • AIS 1100. History of the American Indian to 1865 (HST 1100)
  • AIS 1110. History of the American Indian since 1865 (HST 1110)
  • AIS 3240. Indians of Latin America (HST 3850)
  • AIS 3260. Indians of the Southeast (HST 3260)
  • AIS 4230. Indigenous Women (HST 4230) (Writing Enriched)
  • AIS 4650. Indian Residential and Boarding School Narratives
    (HST 4650) (Writing Enriched)

Religion

  • AIS 2130. American Indian Religious Traditions (REL 2130)
  • AIS 4150. Amerindian Oral Traditions (REL 4150)

Social Work

  • AIS 3880. Native American Populations (SWK 3880/SOC 3880)

Sociology

  • AIS 1050. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (SOC 1050)
  • AIS 3880. Native American Populations (SWK 3880)

 

Service-Learning

In addition to the rigorous intellectual and academic goals of American Indian Studies at UNCP is a central philosophical and practical commitment to affirm contemporary Native American sovereignty through supporting Native communities’ short and long-term needs. AIS classes that involved service learning form a fundamental part of this philosophy, because they allow students, faculty, and staff to forge dynamic community-university partnerships beyond the campus boundaries. Students become active participants in the daily lives of the Indian people within whose community our university exists, and community members gain additional insight into the interests and activities of American Indian Studies students at UNCP. American Indian Studies service learning courses strive to mutually benefit UNCP students and Southeast American Indian community members.

Degree

The Mission of American Indian Studies is to educate students about the rich diversity of American Indian histories and cultures, to promote research and scholarship concerning American Indian issues, and to prepare students for professional or scholarly careers.

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The Department offers a Bachelor of Arts degree, a minor and academic concentration in American Indian Studies.

*It is a university requirement that students have a 2.0 GPA for all coursework (for transfer students, all UNCP coursework) and for the courses in their major.
 

For more information, visit the American Indian Studies section of the UNCP Catalog

American Indian Studies

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke was established in 1887 as an institution for Native Americans. Since 1953, it has had a multi-racial student body. Because of its heritage, the University, through this Department, offers a program to educate students about the rich diversity of American Indian histories and cultures, to promote research and scholarship concerning American Indian issues, and to prepare students for professional or scholarly careers.

The Department offers a Bachelor of Arts, a minor, and an academic concentration in American Indian Studies. Students are encouraged to select courses that touch on as many different aspects of American Indian histories and cultures as possible.

Why Major in American Indian Studies?

American Indian Studies majors are people with curious, critical, and open minds who are eager to understand the holistic histories and contemporary concerns of American Indian and Indigenous peoples regionally, nationally, and globally.  The AIS major at UNCP offers an interdisciplinary education providing both breadth of knowledge about the extensive diversity of Native peoples throughout the Americas, and specific courses concerning regional Southeastern Indian peoples.  With the option of focusing in three areas – Peoples and Histories, Social and Cultural Issues, Stories and Literatures – or creating a General focus from courses within the other three focus areas, AIS majors may tailor their studies toward a specific area of interest while also taking required core courses.

Through examining issues of sovereignty, nation building, colonization, social justice, and the historical roots of American Indian lives as they are lived today, an American Indian Studies major cultivates a powerful educational foundation for graduates to pursue a variety of career paths.  With the cross-cultural understanding and creative problem solving skills gained by majoring in AIS, graduates will leave UNCP prepared to enter graduate school programs or careers in health care, education, fine arts, digital and media production, non-profit organizations, business and entrepreneurship, tribal governance, environmental resource management, law and policy, and many others.

If you are interested in an undergraduate education whose core values strive to provide a meaningful education that supports local American Indian communities and larger Native American constituencies, consider a major, minor, or concentration in American Indian Studies.  Please contact the AIS Department with any questions you may have.

 

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