2013-14 CATALOG

MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION (M.A.Ed.)

Graduate Program Directors

Elementary EducationĖKaren Stanley

Middle Grades EducationĖZoe Locklear

Reading EducationĖHeather Kimberly Dial Sellers

Clinical Mental Health CounselingĖAngela McDonald

Professional School CounselingĖJeffrey Warren

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke offers programs of graduate studies leading to the advanced Master of Arts in Education degree and a graduate-level ďMĒ license in Elementary Education, Middle Grades Education, Reading Education, and Professional School Counseling and to the advanced Master of Arts in Education degree in Clinical Mental Health Counseling.

The M.A.Ed. programs are designed to provide opportunities for continuing professional development and master's level licensure for teachers, school support personnel, and counselors. The education and school support personnel programs are fully accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, the North Carolina State Board of Education, and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. The Professional School Counseling and Clinical Mental Health Counseling Programs are fully accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education Programs.

 

The M.A.Ed. Program Structure

The M.A.Ed. programs leading to advanced teacher licensure (Elementary Education, Middle Grades Education, Reading Education) consist of a total of 36 semester hours. Each M.A.Ed. Licensure area uses a unique configuration of required courses, guided electives, practica, and thesis options to meet program standards.

The M.A.Ed. programs in Clinical Mental Health Counseling and Professional School Counseling consist of 27 semester hours of core counseling courses, 24 semester hours of specialty area courses and electives in clinical mental health counseling or professional school counseling, and 9 semester hours of clinical field placement courses for a total of 60 semester hours.

Full program descriptions are presented in the next section.

 

M.A.Ed. PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND COURSES

Programs:

Elementary Education

Middle Grades Education

Reading Education

Clinical Mental Health Counseling

Professional School Counseling

Courses:

Education Courses (EDN, ELE, RDG)

Counseling Courses (CNS)

Other programs leading to advanced teacher licensure also are available. Master of Arts (M.A.) degree programs are offered in Art Education, English Education, Mathematics Education, Music Education, Physical Education, Science Education, or Social Studies Education. The Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) program is offered in the following areas of specialization: Art Education, Music Education, Physical Education, Middle Grades Education (Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies), and Secondary Education (English, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies).

 

 

MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION (M.A.Ed.)

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

Director: Karen Stanley

 

Program Description

The masterís degree in elementary education is designed for experienced, practicing teachers who are seeking an ďMĒ license and/or planning to apply for National Board Certification.The masterís program extends the theoretical and pedagogical foundations acquired during undergraduate study and builds on the competence acquired by the career teacher through years of practice.Teachers must hold a Standard Professional I license or be eligible to hold a Standard Professional I license at the time of application. Two years full-time teaching experience is recommended but not required.

Program Mission

The mission of the masterís program in elementary education is to prepare the experienced teacher for full participation in the profession as leader, researcher, and master practitioner.The masterís program is designed to promote both teacher autonomy and interdependence through inquiry, reflection, and action.Teachers and teacher educators are encouraged to collaborate on ways to enhance the professional lives of teachers, the learning and well-being of their students, the teaching and learning environments of their schools, and partnerships with parents and families.

Program Goals

The Elementary Education Program is designed to help the career teacher

1. strengthen his/her commitment to the goals of education in a democratic society and use the underlying principles of those goals to guide decisions about practice;

2.develop ways of working with families and other members of the community to reform schools so that all children may learn meaningfully and equitably;

3.become an active member of various professional communities, develop leadership abilities, and seek opportunities to function as a leader within those communities;

4.develop the disposition to strengthen both subject-specific and pedagogical knowledge-bases through systematic research and inquiry on practice;

5. construct (or revise) a conceptual framework for teaching and learning which reflects the philosophical, moral, and pedagogical complexities of teacher decisions about the education of culturally and developmentally diverse learners; and,

6.develop the disposition to reflect critically on the connection between his/her conceptual framework for teaching and learning (theory) and the effectiveness of his/her practice on diverse learners.

 

Requirements for a Master of Arts in Education: Elementary Education

Sem. Hrs.

I: Theory and Research

EDN 5490. Effective Educational Leadership

EDN 5660. Applied Educational Research

6

II. Professional Practice and Pedagogy

ELE 5700. Language, Literacy, and Diversity

ELE 5750. Curricula Design and Choices

ELE 5775. Development, Diversity, and Differentiated Instruction

ELE 5800. Advanced Elementary Mathematics and Science

ELE 5850. Advanced Elementary Social Studies and Language Arts

15

III. Guided Content Courses

In consultation with their program advisor and/or director, candidates will choose 12 semester hours from content courses.

12

IV. Professional Integration and Leadership

ELE 5900. Professional Development and Leadership Seminar

3

 

Total: 36

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MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION (M.A.Ed.)

MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION (6-9)

Director: Zoe Locklear

Specialty Area Advisors:

Language Arts: Roger A. Ladd

Mathematics: Raymond Lee

Science: Rita Hagevik

Social Studies: Scott C. Billingsley

Program Description

The advanced Middle Grades Education degree program is designed for experienced teachers who possess or who are eligible to hold a Standard Professional I license in middle school education. Building on the background knowledge and experience of the classroom teacher, the program seeks to strengthen advanced academic competence through two teaching concentrations in the disciplines, and to relate advanced understandings of the learner, learning process, curriculum, and instructional strategies to the unique needs and characteristics of the emerging adolescent.

Students pursuing the M.A.Ed. are encouraged to complete the programís professional studies core within their initial 15 hours of graduate study. EDN 5950ĖProfessional Development and Leadership Seminar is a capstone experience taken toward the completion of the studentís program of study. All M.A.Ed. candidates are required to construct and present products of learning such as action research projects and professional portfolios that are aligned with the advanced Masterís degree competencies.

 

Program Goals

The Program will prepare the teacher to

1.       Develop an understanding of the history and philosophy of middle grades education and theories about its future development, including organizational components and assessment and evaluation in the middle school setting.

2.       Develop an understanding of middle school curriculum and practices appropriate for the emerging adolescent learner.

3.       Develop a greater understanding of the theoretical base, research, and exemplary practices of middle grades education.

4.       Demonstrate advanced knowledge of the content and pedagogy of the middle school curriculum.

5.       Improve educational practice through self-reflection, self-evaluation, and action research.

 

 

Requirements for a Master of Arts in Education: Middle Grades Education

Sem. Hrs.

Required Professional Studies Core

EDN 5470. Advanced Classroom Management

EDN 5480. Advanced Foundations of American Education

EDN 5490. Effective Educational Leadership

EDN 5660. Applied Educational Research

12

Specialty Area Requirements: Required and Guided Electives in One Subject Area

Students must complete one 21-semester-hour content area concentrations in Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, or Social Studies. Advanced study in any content area chosen for specialization requires foundation discipline knowledge sufficient for graduate-level work.

21

1. Language Arts: (two required courses + five electives)

Required courses: EED* 5510 and EED* 5520

Five courses from the following: ENG* 5000, 5030, 5050, 5100, 5200, 5230, 5440, 5450, 5500, 5610, 5650, 5750, ENGS 5000-5099, 5100-5199, 5200-5299, 5300-5399, 5400-5499, 5700-5799, or ENG 5810, 5830, or 5850

 

2. Science: (one required course + six electives)

Required course: SCE** 5600

Physical Sciences (select at least three): PHY** 5200 or 5480; CHM** 5480 or 5200; GLY** 5010 or 5020

Life Sciences (select at least one): BIO** 5100, 5120, 5250, 5350

At least two additional courses from those listed above.

 

3. Social Studies: (one required course + six electives)

Required course: SSE*** 5750

Social Sciences (select at least three): Geology/Geography (GGY/GLY***), Political Science (PSPA***), Economics (ECN*****), American Indian Studies (AIS***)

History (select at least three): HST*** 5100, 5200, HSTS 5xxx

At least one additional course from those listed above.

 

4. Mathematics: (two required courses + five electives)

Required courses: MATE**** 5500, 5530

Five courses selected from MATE**** 5010, MATH**** 5060, 5080, 5110, MAT**** 5020, 5070,

 

Required Middle Grades Capstone Course

EDN 5760. Advanced Methods for Middle Grades Instruction

EDN 5950. Professional Development and Leadership Seminar

6

 

Total
(minimum):39

Note: For course descriptions, see M.A. in *English Education, **Science Education, ***Social Studies Education, ****Mathematics Education, *****MBA

 

 

MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION (M.A.Ed.)

READING EDUCATION

Director: Heather Kimberly Dial Sellers

 

Program Description

The Master of Arts in Education (M.A.Ed.) in Reading Education is designed for classroom and reading teachers to prepare them as leaders in the field of literacy instruction and as reading specialists.Since the program builds on the knowledge base and experience of the practitioner, teachers who enter the M.A.Ed. must be licensed to teach in North Carolina. Graduate study in reading education will enable teachers to develop expertise in the teaching of reading, the diagnosis and remediation of problems, and the development of successful reading programs. Teachers will also have opportunities to develop leadership competence in the design, delivery, and assessment of reading and services.

 

Special Program Admission Requirements:

Applicants who do not have a degree in a reading-related discipline such as elementary education, special education, or English/ language arts are subject to special program admission requirement(s), which may include prerequisite courses, based on the Program Directorís evaluation of the applicantís transcript.

Program Goals

The M.A.Ed. in Reading Education is organized around four major standards established by the International Reading Association (IRA) for Masterís level literacy specialists.These reflect state-approved standards for reading teachers and expectations set forth by NCATE.All reading courses reflect the four program standards in content, learning opportunities, and requirements.

The four standards are:

1. Reading teacher candidates have knowledge of the foundations of reading.

2. Reading teacher candidates use a wide range of reading assessment tools and results in order to provide developmentally appropriate instruction.

3. Reading teacher candidates understand and apply best instructional practices and techniques in the reading process of all learners.

4. Reading teacher candidates create a literate environment that fosters reading and writing competencies by integrating foundational knowledge and technology.

Please contact the Program Director for the Reading Education Program Progression Worksheet.

 

Requirements for a Master of Arts in Education: Reading Education

Sem. Hrs.

I: Orientation, Theory, and Research

EDN 5660Applied Educational Research

RDG 5150Research in Literacy

RDG 5220Literacy and Literature

RDG 5230Professional Seminar I (1 hour)

RDG 5350Reading Instructional Strategies

13

II: Expanding Content and Pedagogical Knowledge

RDG 5300Reading and Writing in the Content Areas I (K-6)

RDG 5301Reading and Writing in the Content Areas II (6-12)

RDG 5430Professional Seminar II (1 hour)

RDG 5450Reading Development and Assessment

Guided Elective course: With approval of the Program Director, candidates may enroll in one graduate course in another program at UNCP (assuming that they meet its prerequisites); the candidate must complete an Elective Transfer Form laying out the rationale for the elective course furthering the candidateís professional and educational goals. Candidates are particularly encouraged to use EDN 5470, EDN 5480, and EDN 5490 as elective courses.

13

III: Influencing Literacy Instruction and Leadership

RDG 5320Diversity and Multicultural Education

RDG 5330Leadership in Reading

RDG 5610Diagnosis, Assessment, Instruction, and Practicum in Reading

RDG 5630Professional Seminar III (1 hour)

10

 

Total: 36

 

 

MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION (M.A.Ed.)

CLINICAL MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING

Director: Angela McDonald

 

Program Description

The Master of Arts in Education (M.A.Ed.) in Clinical Mental Health Counseling is designed to assist graduate students in the development of competencies necessary for functioning in the role of professional counselor in a variety of settings. The M.A.Ed. in Clinical Mental Health Counseling meets the standards established by the North Carolina Board of Licensed Professional Counselors for Professional Counselor licensure (LPC) and the National Board of Certified Counselorsí standards for national certification as a professional counselor (NCC). The program is located in the School of Education, Department of School Administration and Counseling, and shares a common core of classes with the Professional School Counseling Program.This program does not prepare students to be school counselors. Students interested in careers in K-12 school counseling should apply to the Professional School Counseling Program at UNCP.

The M.A.Ed. in Clinical Mental Health Counseling is organized into three curriculum components:

1. Core counseling courses: Core counseling courses provide a foundation of professional knowledge and skills for counseling students during the first two years of their programs of study. The core counseling courses are shared with the Professional School Counseling Program. Core counseling courses must be successfully completed with a passing grade prior to enrollment in field placement courses. Students are also required to take and pass a comprehensive examination, the Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Exam (CPCE), after completing their core counseling courses. A passing score is required for progression through and graduation from the program. The CPCE is a standardized counseling exam that assesses student learning in the core areas. The cost of the exam is $45 and students are allowed three attempts to pass the exam. Students must submit the application and pay the application fee by the required deadline.

2. Specialty area and elective courses: Specialty area and elective courses build on the foundation of knowledge and skills established in the core counseling courses by providing instruction in setting-specific and population-specific counseling practices. Specialty area courses may be taken concurrently with clinical field placement courses. Students consult with their academic advisors to determine the specialty and elective courses that will meet degree requirements and be best suited to the studentsí needs and interests.

3. Clinical field placement courses: Clinical field placement courses integrate the knowledge and skills addressed during academic course work with real world, supervised experience. The clinical field experiences occur in university-approved community agency, mental health clinic, college counseling center, and private practice settings and include on-site supervision as well as university-based supervision. The Counseling Practicum is a 3-credit-hour course that consists of a 100-hour field placement experience in an approved site and on-campus group supervision and instruction occurring weekly. Students complete the Counseling Practicum during their second year of study after completing the core counseling courses. The Counseling Internship is a 3-credit-hour course completed twice over two semesters and consists of a total of 600 hours of field placement experience, 300 hours per semester in an approved site with on-campus group supervision and instruction occurring weekly. Students must submit applications for participation in the clinical field placement courses during the semester prior to beginning their practicum courses.

Courses are scheduled in the evenings and during the summer months. The courses are delivered in a variety of modalities including online, face-to-face, and hybrid formats. The program is a 60-credit hour degree and can be completed in three years.

 

Program Mission

The mission of the Graduate Counseling Programs at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke is to train professional counselors committed to improving the mental health and human development of diverse individuals served in schools and communities. Through research, service, and teaching, the faculty members collaborate with students to prepare counseling practitioners who have strong counselor identities, effective clinical and leadership skills, and cultural competence. The counseling programs engage in continual program evaluation and revision to maintain alignment with the counseling professionís national standards.

 

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of a counseling program at UNCP, students will show evidence of being reflective practitioners and critical thinkers who seek to respect diverse worldviews, demonstrate self-evaluation and self-reflection strategies, and engage in ongoing interpersonal skill development. Students will develop professional identities as counselors and engage as active members of their communities.

 

Program-Specific Admissions Standards (see also Graduate Admissions)

In addition to the School of Graduate Studies admissions requirements:

1. Submit an essay detailing experiences and goals relevant to professional counseling;

2. Submit three letters of recommendation from individuals with whom the applicant has professional affiliation, such as former faculty members or supervisors; and

3. Participate in an interview with program faculty.

 

Non-Degree-Seeking Students

Prospective students interested in registering for coursework to achieve credentialing in either of the graduate counseling areas should contact the Non-Degree-Seeking Student Coordinator, Dr. Angela McDonald (angela.mcdonald@uncp.edu), for information. Requests to take courses for credentialing purposes must be made to the Coordinator and will be reviewed by program faculty.Non-degree-seeking students, including graduates of either UNCP counseling program, should complete the School of Graduate Studies application form following the procedures for Enrollment for Enrichment Purposes and consult with the Non-Degree-Seeking Student Coordinator two months prior to the start of the semester in which the students would like to register for courses. Students who are permitted to take courses as non-degree-seeking students will attend an orientation session with the Coordinator. Non-degree-seeking students are not permitted to take field placement courses at UNCP in either counseling program.

 

Requirements for a Master of Arts in Education: Clinical Mental Health Counseling

Sem. Hrs.

Core Counseling Courses

CNS 5000 Professional and Ethical Issues

CNS 5050 Counseling Skills and Techniques

CNS 5500 Research and Program Evaluation

CNS 5400 Theories of Counseling

CNS 5700 Career Counseling and Development

CNS 5025 Lifespan Development

CNS 5100 Groups in Counseling

CNS 5600 Assessment Practices in Counseling (CNS 5500 is a prereq. to CNS 5600)

CNS 5800 Multicultural and Social Justice Counseling

27

Specialty Area and Elective Courses

Complete all of the following:

CNS 5450 The Clinical Mental Health Counselor

CNS 5360 Diagnosis and Treatment Planning

CNS 5080 Gender and Sexuality Issues in Counseling

CNS 5850 Theory and Process of Family Counseling

CNS 5900 Issues in Addictions for Counselors

CNS 5060 Crisis Intervention

Select two elective courses from:

CNS 5250 Counseling Children and Adolescents,

CNS 5310 Mental Health Issues in Childhood and Adolescence,

CNS 5070 College Counseling and Student Affairs,

CNS 5870 The Family and Addiction,

CNSS 5xxx Special Topics in Counseling (may be repeated for different topics).

24

Clinical Field Placement Courses

CNS 6100 Counseling Practicum (Clinical Mental Health Setting)

CNS 6120 Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship (repeated once to earn a total of 6 credit hours)

9

Minimum total semester hours required for graduation

Total: 60

 

MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION (M.A.Ed.)

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL COUNSELING

Director: Jeffrey Warren

 

Program Description

The Master of Arts in Education (M.A.Ed.) in Professional School Counseling is designed to assist graduate students in the development of skills and practices necessary for functioning in the role of a professional school counselor in public and private elementary, middle, and secondary schools. The M.A.Ed. in Professional School Counseling meets the standards established by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction for Professional School Counselor licensure and the National Board of Certified Counselorsí standards for national certification as a professional counselor (NCC). The program is located in the School of Education, Department of Public Administration and Counseling, and shares a common core of classes with the Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program. This program does not prepare students to be clinical mental health counselors. Students interested in careers in clinical mental health counseling should apply to the Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program at UNCP.

The M.A.Ed. in Professional School Counseling is organized into three curriculum components:

1. Core counseling courses: Core counseling courses provide a foundation of professional knowledge and skills for counseling students during the first two years of their programs of study. The core counseling courses are shared with the Professional School Counseling Program. Core counseling courses must be successfully completed with a passing grade prior to enrollment in field placement courses. Students are also required to take and pass a comprehensive examination, the Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Exam (CPCE), after completing their core counseling courses. A passing score is required for progression through and graduation from the program. The CPCE is a standardized counseling exam that assesses student learning in the core areas. The cost of the exam is $45 and students are allowed three attempts to pass the exam. Students must submit the application and pay the application fee by the required deadline.

2. Specialty area and elective courses: Specialty area and elective courses build on the foundation of knowledge and skills established in the core counseling courses by providing instruction in setting-specific and population-specific counseling practices. Specialty area courses may be taken concurrently with clinical field placement courses. Students consult with their academic advisors to determine the specialty and elective courses that will meet degree requirements and be best suited to the studentsí needs and interests.

3. Clinical field placement courses: Clinical field placement courses integrate the knowledge and skills addressed during academic course work with real world, supervised experience. The clinical field experiences occur in university-approved K-12 school settings and include on-site supervision as well as university-based supervision. The Counseling Practicum is a 3-credit-hour course that consists of a 100-hour field placement experience in an approved site and on-campus group supervision and instruction occurring weekly. Students complete the Counseling Practicum during their second year of study after completing the core counseling courses. The Counseling Internship is a 3-credit-hour course completed twice over two semesters and consists of a total of 600 hours of field placement experience, 300 hours per semester in an approved site with on-campus group supervision and instruction occurring weekly. Students must submit applications for participation in the clinical field placement courses during the semester prior to beginning their practicum courses.

Courses are scheduled in the evenings and during the summer months. The courses are delivered in a variety of modalities including online, face-to-face, and hybrid formats. The program is a 60-credit hour degree and can be completed in three years.

 

Program Mission

The mission of the Graduate Counseling Programs at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke is to train professional counselors committed to improving the mental health and human development of diverse individuals served in schools and communities. Through research, service, and teaching, the faculty members collaborate with students to prepare counseling practitioners who have strong counselor identities, effective clinical and leadership skills, and cultural competence. The counseling programs engage in continual program evaluation and revision to maintain alignment with the counseling professionís national standards.

 

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of a counseling program at UNCP, students will show evidence of being reflective practitioners and critical thinkers who seek to respect diverse worldviews, demonstrate self-evaluation and self-reflection strategies, and engage in ongoing interpersonal skill development. Students will develop professional identities as counselors and engage as active members of their communities.

 

Program-Specific Admissions Standards (see also Graduate Admissions)

In addition to the School of Graduate Studies admissions requirements:

1. Submit an essay detailing experiences and goals relevant to professional school counseling;

2. Submit three letters of recommendation from individuals with whom the applicant has professional affiliation, such as former faculty members or supervisors; and

3. Participate in an interview with program faculty.

 

Licensure-Only Students

Candidates possessing a graduate degree in a counseling area and who do not desire a degree specifically in school counseling may apply for admittance to the Professional School Counseling program for licensure-only status and will be prescribed a Plan of Study (POS).

Candidates who wish to enter the school counseling licensure-only program are students who have already earned at least a 48 credit hour masterís degree from a regionally accredited institution in a counseling degree program.

A summary of the protocol and policy is as follows:

1. Candidates seeking licensure-only status must apply for program admission through the School of Graduate Studies. All aspects of the application process must be completed (i.e., essay, letters of reference, interview, and official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate level coursework). Applications must also include a recent (within 5 years) MAT or GRE score. Licensure-only candidates are subject to the same admission criteria as degree-seeking candidates. Candidates must meet the criteria for full-standing status.

2. Only candidates with at least a 48-hour graduate degree in counseling from a regionally accredited program will be considered for licensure-only status. An example of this situation is when a practicing agency counselor with a recent degree in community counseling desires training and licensure to practice as a school counselor in a public or private school setting. Practicing teachers who hold ďAĒ or ďMĒ licensure in a teaching area (e.g., special education, administration, middle grades) and who desire training as a school counselor are not eligible for licensure-only status, but are invited to apply for the full masterís degree program.

3. Once admitted, students will be issued a Plan of Study (POS). The POS is recommended by the Counseling Programs Faculty and jointly approved by the Professional School Counseling Program Director and the Teacher Education Licensure Officer.

4.Students must complete their POS within six years.

5.Students must earn a ďBĒ or better in all graded coursework applied toward satisfying licensure-only requirements. In courses that are graded on a pass/fail basis, students must earn a ďpass.Ē Failure to meet this requirement will render the student ineligible to continue licensure-only study and ineligible to receive a recommendation for licensure from UNCP.

6.Students are obligated to adhere to all other policies established by the program, school, and university.

7.Students must take Praxis II Specialty Area Test in Professional School Counseling upon completion of the POS. Official scores must be submitted to the Teacher Education Licensure Officer.Students who do not achieve a passing Praxis II score set by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) will be ineligible to receive a recommendation for licensure from UNCP.

8. Students should be aware that UNCP makes recommendation for licensure only; licensure is granted by the NCDPI. Thus, there may be other requirements mandated by NCDPI before a license will be issued. ††††

 

Non-Degree-Seeking Students

Prospective students interested in registering for coursework to achieve credentialing in either of the graduate counseling areas should contact the Non-Degree-Seeking Student Coordinator, Dr. Angela McDonald (angela.mcdonald@uncp.edu) for information. Requests to take courses for credentialing purposes must be made to the Coordinator and will be reviewed by program faculty.Non-degree-seeking students, including graduates of either UNCP counseling program, should complete the School of Graduate Studies application form following the procedures for Enrollment for Enrichment Purposes and consult with the Non-Degree-Seeking Student Coordinator two months prior to the start of the semester in which the students would like to register for courses. Students who are permitted to take courses as non-degree-seeking students will attend an orientation session with the Coordinator. Non-degree-seeking students are not permitted to take field placement courses at UNCP in either counseling program.

 

 

Requirements for a Master of Arts in Education: Professional School Counseling

Sem. Hrs.

Core Counseling Courses

CNS 5000 Professional and Ethical Issues

CNS 5050 Counseling Skills and Techniques

CNS 5500 Research and Program Evaluation

CNS 5400 Theories of Counseling

CNS 5700 Career Counseling and Development

CNS 5025 Lifespan Development

CNS 5100 Groups in Counseling

CNS 5600 Assessment Practices in Counseling (CNS 5500 is a prereq. to CNS 5600)

CNS 5800 Multicultural and Social Justice Counseling

27

Specialty Area and Elective Courses

Complete all of the following:

CNS 5350 The Professional School Counselor

CCN 5900 Seminar in School Counseling

CNS 5250 Counseling Children and Adolescents

CNS 5310 Mental Health Issues in Childhood and Adolescence

CNS 5900 Issues in Addictions for Counselors

CNS 5060 Crisis Intervention

Select two elective courses from:

CNS 5360 Diagnosis and Treatment Planning

CNS 5080 Gender and Sexuality Issues in Counseling

CNS 5850 Theory and Process of Family Counseling

CNS 5070 College Counseling and Student Affairs

CNS 5870 The Family and Addiction

CNSS 5xxx Special Topics in Counseling (may be repeated for different topics).

24

Clinical Field Placement Courses

CNS 6000 Counseling Practicum (School Counseling Setting)

CNS 6130 School Counseling Internship (repeated once to earn a total of 6 credit hours)

9

Minimum total semester hours required for graduation

Total: 60

 

 

 

COURSES

EDUCATION (EDN)

EDN 5000. Educational Leadership (3 hours)

Required of candidates for the Master of Arts in Education degree who are preparing for licensure as principals or supervisors. Emphasis is given to educational purposes, school program development, group leadership functions, management of school facilities, community-school interaction, and intraschool and interschool coordination.

EDN 5010. Principles of Supervision (3 hours)

Analysis of issues, problems, and practices in supervision of instruction. Development and synthesis of a conceptual structure for guiding group process and individual leadership behavior in curriculum research and development, inservice education, and evaluation of teaching and learning.

EDN 5030. School Finance (3 hours)

Problems relating to financing public education; theory of taxation, types of taxes; current practices of educational finance; federal, state, and local support of education formulas for distribution of school aids; budget; procuring revenue; financial capital outlays. Financing school plant construction; maintenance of the plant; insurance of property; taking inventory; and school supplies. Includes the construction of a school budget.

EDN 5040.An Introduction to the Basics Tenets of Education (3 hours)

This course is intended for students pursuing the Master of Arts in Teaching degree. It is designed to introduce students to the foundational fields of education: philosophy and psychology, with an emphasis on the development of an appreciation for the role and responsibility of the teacher as the instructional leader in the educational community. There is a field experience component. Co-requisite: EDN 5040.

EDN 5050. School Facilities (3 hours)

Study of the problems involved in financing the construction of school facilities, the procurement of architectural services, the cooperative development of educational specifications, and the construction of school facilities. Includes the management of school facilities for maximum and optimal use; planning for equipment acquisition, circulation and maintenance; and the analysis of the facilities problems of schools and school systems.

EDN 5120. Advanced Study of Exceptionality in Children (3 hours)

An introduction to and an analysis of the principles, problems, characteristics, and psychological aspects of children who have mental retardation; learning disabilities; visual impairments; hearing handicaps; communication disorders; behavior disorders multiple, severe, and physical handicaps; as well as talents and gifts. Contemporary issues in special education as they relate to the inservice educator are explored.Field experience required.

EDN 5130. Individualized Program Development for Exceptional Students (3 hours)

The focus of this course is the development and implementation of individualized educational programs for the total development of exceptional students. Topics include legal requirements, assessing individual performances, placement and related services, developing long-range and short-term objectives, monitoring and evaluating the IEP, and conferencing/communication skill-building.

EDN 5140. Management of Exceptional Students in the General Classroom (3 hours)

This course is designed to provide the general classroom teacher and administrative supervisory personnel with a study of the instructional and behavioral techniques, materials, and resources used in the education of mainstreamed students. Emphasis is on disabled, educable mentally handicapped, and emotionally handicapped students.

EDN 5260. Advanced Instructional Approaches to Middle School Grades (3 hours)

Addresses the unique teaching strategies and specialized materials and resources for the middle grades classroom.Focus on specialized curriculum and teaching styles which meet these needs, especially interdisciplinary team teaching.Prerequisite: EDN 5650 or EDN 5820, EDN 5660, EDN 5500.

EDN 5440.Survey of Educational Research (3 hours)

This course is designed to broaden studentsí ideas and practices of educational research and afford them knowledge regarding typical research approaches and methods in education, interpreting and critiquing professional research literature, using research findings to validate and modify decisions about teaching and learning, understanding commonly used descriptive and inferential statistics, and using American Psychological Association (APA) style. ††

EDN 5450.Introduction to Curriculum Design and Best Practices (3 hours)

This course is intended for students who are enrolled in the Master of Arts in Teaching Program. It is designed to provide students with an introduction to curriculum design and best practices in lesson design, including backward design, instructional strategies such as differentiated instruction, and various forms of assessment. There is a field experience component.

EDN 5460.Field Experience (0 hours)

This course is intended for students pursuing the Master of Arts in Teaching degree. It is designed to provide the structured field experience that supports the practical application of theoretical constructs.Graduate students in programs at UNCP will actively engage with clinical teachers and the K-12 students to broaden their knowledge bases and engage in school-based professional activities.(Course may be repeated.)

EDN 5470. Advanced Classroom Management (3 hours)

This course is designed to develop graduate studentsí knowledge base related to the theory and techniques of classroom management. Emphasis is placed on how those understandings can be utilized to establish a positive and respectful learning environment for all students. A variety of classroom management programs are examined and evaluated.

EDN 5480. Advanced Foundations of American Education (3 hours)

This course focuses on the multicultural 21st-century classroom and its foundations in educational philosophy and educational psychology. Course activities are designed to nurture the professional disposition for critical self-reflection and to develop the theoretical knowledge base that undergirds best practices in the classroom. Emphasis is placed on promoting positive learning outcomes for all students.

EDN 5490. Effective Educational Leadership (3 hours)

This course is designed to nurture and develop practitioners as leaders in their classrooms, in their schools, in their professions, in their communities, and in the broader society. The primary focus is on teachers as leaders in the teaching-learning process. Graduate students will begin their leadership projects in this course.

EDN 5500. Applied Educational Psychology (3 hours)

Emphasis is on using principles of learning, development, motivation, management, and assessment to validate and/or modify teacher decisions about the diverse needs of learners in socially responsible learning environments. Students design improvement plans based on areas such as multiple intelligence theory, cognitive processing, brain research, cooperative learning, inclusion, multiculturalism, and discipline.Field experience required.

EDN 5520. Psychology of the Emerging Adolescent (6-9) (3 hours)

An analysis of the implications of physical, cognitive, socio-emotional, and moral development as they influence the behavior, learning, and adjustment of emerging adolescents. The theories of Ericson, Piaget, and Adler will be examined. Practical classroom application of theory and research will be emphasized.

EDN 5600. Sociological Foundations of Education (3 hours)

Contemporary social problems and subcultures which relate to patterns of public education. A sociological analysis of the nature of the school and its impact on the community and on patterns of instruction. Anthropological and sociological materials will be employed.

EDN 5620. Advanced Educational Assessment (3 hours)

This course is designed to address principles, theories, and techniques of educational measurement and classroom assessment.Topics addressed in this course are assessment techniques; interpreting test results; political, philosophical, and ethical issues in testing and assessment; and applications to classroom, district, and state testing programs.

EDN 5650. Applied Philosophy of Education (3 hours)

Emphasis is on acquiring the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed for reflective teaching, including the articulation of a philosophical theoretical position on teaching, language, and learning for use in planning, implementing, and evaluating practice. Students will analyze the philosophical and theoretical assumptions underlying various models of teaching and, learning. The process of constructing a professional portfolio based on NBPTíS guidelines frames course activities.

EDN 5660. Applied Educational Research (3 hours)

Emphasis is on understanding research designs and methods in education including an introduction to elementary statistics, interpreting and critiquing professional research literature, using research findings to validate and modify decisions about teaching and learning, and conducting action research in the classroom, school, and community.Field experience required.

EDN 5740. Reading Practicum (3 hours)

In this course, students have practical experience remediating diverse studentsí reading difficulties in classroom settings, using a variety of instructional, management, and assessment strategies.Review and critique sessions with colleagues are conducted at spaced intervals during the course.Prerequisite: EDN 5340 or consent of the Program Director.

EDN 5750. Advanced Diagnosis of Reading Difficulties (3 hours)

In this course, teachers work one-on-one or in small groups of children in a supervised laboratory setting. Published case studies are analyzed and original case-studies developed which include observations, use of evaluation methods, proposed correction strategies, implementation plans, and critical reflection on the planned intervention. Case studies are presented to colleagues for review and refinement.Prerequisite: EDN 5740 or consent of the Program Director.

EDN 5760.Advanced Methods for Middle Grades Instruction

Course is designed to identify appropriate student learning goals; design learning experiences that include a variety of developmentally appropriate instructional strategies; manage a range of students, materials, and classroom activities; and honor studentsí diversity with respect to learning style, motivation, race/ethnicity, gender, and language proficiency.

EDN 5800.Effective Instructional Practices(3 hours)

This course explores the development of effective instructional practices designed to significantly improve the academic success of all students.Topics covered in the class include (but are not limited to): responsiveness to studentsí needs, reading and writing in the content areas, lesson planning, instructional expectations, technology integration, classroom management, higher-order thinking skills, and diversity.Field experience required.

EDN 5810.Internship (3 hours)

Ten week, full-time internship experiences in an off-campus public school setting appropriate for the licensure area. Prerequisite: Approval of Graduate Program Director.

EDN 5820.Instructional Development(3 hours)

This course provides students with the knowledge and skills required for designing and evaluating instructional plans, units, and educational programs.Topics will include types of learning, learning hierarchies, task analysis, educational goal and objective formulation, assessing learner entry skills, and evaluation.The course will include a variety of activities with a strong emphasis on group problem solving and individual projects.Field experience required.

EDN 5900.Advanced Practicum in Teaching (K-6) (3 hours)

A support seminar for M.A.Ed. candidates during the year they are completing the application process for National Board Certification, including preparation for written assessments. A National Board Certified teacher, a faulty advisor, and or an NBC evaluator will be part of the support group. By arrangement. Fall. Prerequisite: Completion of M.A.Ed. course requirements

EDN 5950. Professional Development and Leadership Seminar (3 hours)

This is the capstone experience for teachers completing the M.A.Ed. in Education. Teachers integrate the knowledge and insights gained from experiences in previous courses into final revisions of their conceptual frameworks and related plans. Based on updated self-assessment, teachers also develop goals for future professional development. Leadership projects are finalized, published and submitted for review by the appropriate education graduate faculty. (Teachers choosing National Board Certification as a program product will apply for candidacy at this time.)

EDN 5990. Independent Study (3 hours)

An independent study of the problems and issues of education relevant to the studentís major study areas or areas of concentration carried out by the student at the University and in the field under the supervision of the studentís major advisor.

EDN 6000. Thesis in Education (3 - 6 hours)

The student prepares a Masterís Degree thesis in the area of the studentís major under the individual direction of the studentís major advisor and thesis committee. Graded on a Satisfactory (Pass [P]), Unsatisfactory (Fail [F]) basis. Prerequisite: Completion of 2I semester hours of graduate work; EDN 5660; permission of the studentís major advisor; and permission of the Dean of Graduate Studies.

EDNS 5xxx. Special Topics (1-3 hours)

Examination of a special area or topic of special importance and relevance within the field of education. Topics to be considered will be announced prior to registration and may vary.This course may be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite:Permission of instructor.

 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (ELE)

ELE 5700.Language, Literacy, and Diversity(3 hours)

The purpose of this course is to provide a focus on contexts and processes through which language†† develops including attainment of second languages, and the cognitive, social/emotional, and cultural†† aspects of language.This foundation will provide the framework to differentiate curricula, instruction and assessment in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and viewing through the use of culturally diverse and appropriate literature.†† Students will demonstrate collaboration skills with families and specialists within the school settings. Prerequisites:EDN 5660 and EDN 5490††

ELE 5750.Curricula Design and Choices(3 hours)

The purpose of this course is to assist teachers in developing comprehensive understanding and ability to implement curriculum frameworks in the 21st century classroom. Teachers will use philosophical viewpoints to inform decisions related to organization, structure and sequence of curriculum, selection of resources, approaches to engaging learners in inclusive, supportive environments and assessment of learner outcomes. Prerequisites: EDN 5660 and EDN 5490

ELE 5775. Development, Diversity, and Differentiated Instruction (3 hours)

The purpose of this course is to assist teachers in developing a contextual perception of diverse learners and their educational needs based on information about childrenís family life, culture, and stages of development. Teachers will assess childrenís development, align curriculum, design instruction to accommodate developmental and cultural differences, and establish respectful learning environments. Teachers will also explore ways to nurture and motivate family involvement in the education process. Prerequisites: EDN 5660 and EDN 5490

ELE 5800. Advanced Elementary Mathematics and Science (3 hours)

The purpose of this course is to assist teachers in deepening their understanding of mathematics and science in facilitating student learning. Emphasis will be placed on a constructivist approach to learning, and incorporating research as it translates to instructional practices. Practices will include: skillful structure in sequence of curriculum, approaches to learner motivation and content engagement, establishing routines for managing the learning environment, appropriate methods for assessing resources and student outcomes, differentiation of instruction for students with special needs (environmental and cultural), and establishing collaborative efforts with colleagues and resource specialists in schools and community. Prerequisites: EDN 5660 and EDN 5490

ELE 5850. Advanced Elementary Social Studies and Language Arts (3 hours)

The purpose of this course is to provide opportunity for teachers to improve student learning in social studies and language arts through systematic analysis and reflection on the cycles of teaching and learning. A primary focus is placed on connecting curriculum and instructional design, desired learning outcomes, content, diverse learners, instructional resources and assessment measures, in the context of developing global understandings and multiple literacies. Prerequisites: EDN 5660 and EDN 5490

ELE 5900. Professional Development and Leadership Seminar (3 hours)

The purpose of this course is to provide a capstone experience for teachers completing the M.A.Ed. degree in Elementary Education. Teachers integrate the knowledge and insights gained from experiences in previous courses into final revisions of their professional portfolio, their conceptual 32 frameworks and related plans. Based on updated selfassessment, teachers also develop goals for future professional development. Leadership and action research projects are finalized, published and submitted for review by the appropriate education graduate faculty.

READING EDUCATION (RDG)

RDG 5150. Research in Literacy (3 hours)

This course is a study of the theory and research related to literacy and language development in childhood and adolescence, including second language acquisition. The social, psychological, and cultural influences on language and literacy learning in both the home and school are examined. Students use theoretical and research foundations to conduct classroom -based research to improve literacy learning.

RDG 5220. Literacy and Literature (3 hours)

A survey of children's/adolescent fiction, nonfiction, and other reading materials, including instructional technology resources. Methods for leveling and choosing appropriate material for diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds are reviewed. A major focus is the relationship between the reader and the literary text, the reading process, and the implications for reading instruction and comprehension skills.

RDG 5230. Professional Seminar I (1 hour)

The seminar is focused on the self‐direction and professional development of literacy specialists, with an increasing emphasis on becoming instructional leaders of the 21st century, as students plan to meet their own learning needs in instructional/technological expertise; expand their awareness of the role of the literacy specialist; design, develop, and present their basic program portfolio and their Masterís Research Project or Comprehensive Portfolio.

RDG 5280. Developing and Guiding Reading Programs (3 hours)

A study and evaluation of selected curricula and programs in reading and the planning of a total school reading program. Teachers visit and evaluate exemplary school reading programs. Special emphasis will be given to the leadership functions of a reading teacher in diverse roles in terms of coaching classroom teachers and administrators in the improvement of reading instruction and involving studentsí families in literacy development. Prerequisite: 15 semester hours of graduate level course work in reading or consent of the Program Director.

RDG 5300. Reading and Writing in the ContentAreas I (3 hours)

This course is designed to provide teachers with knowledge of established and innovative practices of integrating reading and writing in grades K6 in a variety of contentareas, such as mathematics, social studies, and health. Strategies to support learning for English Language Learners will be explored. Field experience is required. Prerequisite: Completion of strand I

RDG 5301. Reading and Writing in the ContentAreas II (3 hours)

This course is designed to provide teachers with knowledge of established and innovative practices of integrating reading and writing in grades 612 in a variety of contentareas, such as mathematics, social studies, and health. Strategies to support learning for English Language Learners will be explored. Field experience is required. Prerequisites: RDG 5300 and completion of strand I

RDG 5310. Principles of Testing and Measurement in Reading (3 hours)

This course provides a fundamental development of the features and roles of measurement in reading education with emphasis being given to understanding teachermade and standardized tests and scales. Consideration will be given to statistical concepts of measurement as they apply in reading education. Prerequisite: 9 semester hours of previous course work in reading.

RDG 5320. Diversity and Multicultural Education (3 hours)

This course is an indepth study of theory, research, and pedagogy related to the racial, ethnic, gender, and socioeconomic aspects of diversity and how these impact student achievement and teacher expectations. The need for multicultural education and culturally responsive teaching is emphasized; related strategies are explored. Field experience is required. Prerequisite: Completion of strand I.

RDG 5330. Leadership in Reading (3 hours)

This course is designed to aid the special reading teacher in filling several diverse roles within a school setting. Special emphasis will be given to the roles of leadteacher and resourceteacher especially in terms of aiding the classroom teacher with developmental and corrective reading classes. The course will include a supervised fieldbased component whereby the student gains practical experience working in leadership roles with classroom teachers. Prerequisite: Completion of strand II and permission of the instructor.

RDG 5340. Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Difficulties (3 hours)

This course will assist the teacher of reading in locating causes of reading difficulties and prescribing corrective procedures. It is designed to give the classroom teacher practical application of methods in solving reading problems. It will include sample lessons and demonstration of remedial methods. Prerequisite: a minimum of 3 semester hours of graduate level course work in reading or consent of the Program Director.

RDG 5350. Reading Instructional Strategies (3 hours)

This course is designed to provide teachers with knowledge of established and innovative practices of teaching reading and writing. Strategies to support learning for English Language Learners will be explored. Field experience is required. Prerequisite: Completion of RDG 5150.

RDG 5390. Reading Clinic (3 hours)

This course is designed to provide the reading teacher with practical experiences remediating studentsí reading difficulties. The reading teacher will work oneonone and with small groups of children in a supervised laboratory setting. Prerequisite: 15 semester hours of graduate level course work in reading

RDG 5400. Preparation and Selection of Materials for Teaching Reading (3 hours)

This advanced level course is designed to enable the reading teacher to evaluate and select materials in 81 terms of specific instructional situations and needs. Additional emphasis will be given to the processes of design, development, and preparation of instructional materials for specific reading instructional needs. Prerequisite: 15 semester hours of graduate level course work in reading.

RDG 5430.Professional Seminar II (1 hour)

The seminar is focused on the self‐direction and professional development of literacy specialists, with an increasing emphasis on becoming instructional leaders of the 21st century, as students plan to meet their own learning needs in instructional/technological expertise; expand their awareness of the role of the literacy specialist; design, develop, and present their basic program portfolio and their Masterís Research Project or Comprehensive Portfolio. Prerequisite: Completion of Strand I

RDG 5450. Reading Development and Assessment (3 hours)

A study of the psychological factors in learning to read, in reading ability, in reading disabilities, and in the bases for instructional methods and materials in reading. Topics will range from perception and learning theory to the implications of cultural differences and language factors as they affect both the childís learning to read and the teacherís effective facilitation of this learning. A thorough overview of phonics will be explored within informal assessments. Strategies to support learning for English Language Learners will be explored. Field Experience required. Prerequisite: Completion of RDG 5150 and RDG 5350.

RDG 5610. Diagnosis, Assessment, Instruction, and Practicum in Reading (3 hours)

This course will assist the literacy specialist in locating causes of reading difficulties, diagnosing, and prescribing corrective procedures. It is designed to give the literacy specialist practical application of methods in solving reading problems. Published case studies are analyzed and original case studies developed which include observations, use of evaluation methods proposed correction strategies, implementation plans, and critical reflection on the planned intervention. Review and critique sessions with colleagues are conducted at spaced intervals during the course. Teachers work oneonone or in small groups of children in a practicum setting. Field experiences required. Prerequisite: Completion of Strand II.

RDG 5630.Professional Seminar III (1 hour)

The seminar is focused on the self‐direction and professional development of literacy specialists, with an increasing emphasis on becoming instructional leaders of the 21st century, as students plan to meet their own learning needs in instructional/technological expertise; expand their awareness of the role of the literacy specialist; design, develop, and present their basic program portfolio and their Masterís Research Project or Comprehensive Portfolio. Prerequisites: Completion of Strands I and II and 18 hours of reading courses.

RDG 5830. Professional Seminars I-III (1 hour)

The seminar will focus on the selfdirection and professional development of literacy specialists, with an increasing emphasis on becoming instructional leaders of the 21st century, as students plan to meet their own learning needs in instructional/technological expertise; expand their awareness of the role of the literacy specialist; design, develop, and present their basic program portfolio and their Masterís Research Project or Comprehensive Portfolio. This is a one-hour course for which enrollment and successful completion will be required three times during the program.

RDGS 5xxx. Special Topics in Reading Education (3 hours)

Guided investigation of topics in reading education, such as curriculum revision, course or program design, newly evolved trends in reading education, and implications of research in reading education. This course will be an elective option within the reading education program for reading education candidates/students. Prerequisites: Completion of Strands I and II and 18 hours of reading courses.

 

COUNSELING (CNS)

CNS 5000.Professional and Ethical Issues in Counseling

This course is an introduction to the profession of counseling and includes a study of the history, philosophy, ethical and legal considerations, and professional organizations related to the delivery of counseling, consultation, and advocacy. Students will learn about the ethics, credentialing practices and standards of the counseling profession, the suggested disposition and self-care practices of counselors, and the administrative procedures of counseling, consulting, and referral services in multiple settings. Students will also receive an introduction to the supervision processes and practices in the role of the professional development of counselors. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Admission to the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program or the Professional School Counseling program.

CNS 5025. Lifespan Development

This course is designed to help counselors address the needs of clients at all developmental levels in multicultural contexts. The course focus emphasizes strategies for facilitating optimal development. Theories and models of growth and learning, personality development, wellness, and resilience for individuals and families are presented. The course addresses contextual factors that influence normal and abnormal behavior. Students are encouraged to apply the theories and models of development in intervention selection and conceptualization of problems in living.Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Admission to the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program or the Professional School Counseling program.

CNS 5050. Counseling Skills and Techniques

Students will learn counseling skills and techniques through classroom instruction and experiential activities. Counselor characteristics and behaviors that influence the counseling process will be addressed. This course focuses on the use of empathic listening and interviewing skills in developing therapeutic relationships with diverse clients in a multicultural society. The course also includes an orientation to wellness and prevention in the counseling process. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Admission to the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program or the Professional School Counseling program.

CNS 5060. Crisis Intervention

This course will explore the role, function, and responsibilities of professional counselors in periods of crisis and disaster.Crisis intervention theory will be studied in an effort to inform professional practice in clinical and educational settings during emergencies and disasters. The effects of crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events will be addressed. Suicide prevention and intervention models, including the use of psychological first aid strategies are included in the course content. Ethical and cultural considerations in the delivery of crisis services will be examined. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Completion of all core counseling courses or permission of the instructor.

CNS 5070.College Counseling and Student Affairs

An overview of student services higher in education, and a study of the history, philosophy, issues and trends in college counseling.Topics to be covered include college student development, college and career counseling issues and strategies, and student affairs services such as advisement, placement and enrollment planning, residence life, academic support, and student activities.Credit, 3 semester hours.PREREQ: Completion of all core counseling courses or permission of the instructor.

CNS 5080.Gender and Sexuality Issues in Counseling

The course is designed to develop studentsí knowledge related to human sexuality and gender issues relevant to professional counseling. Students will develop an understanding of the varied sexuality issues which may be encountered in a variety of practice settings and also learn appropriate skills in assessment and intervention. Reflection activities will be used to increase awareness of personal perceptions, attitudes, and affect related to sexuality issues. The course provides an overview of the counselorís role in counseling students, individuals, couples, and families with sex-related concerns. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Completion of all core counseling courses or permission of the instructor.

CNS 5100.Groups in Counseling

This course addresses the principles of group dynamics, group leadership skills, theories of group counseling, and group counseling methods. Current trends in group work, including professional, ethical, and legal issues relevant to working with groups in a multicultural society are explored. Students will learn the fundamental skills and techniques for designing and implementing group counseling activities during experiential learning activities in which students participate as group members.Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Admission to the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program or the Professional School Counseling program.

CNS 5250. Counseling Children and Adolescents

This course provides an opportunity for students to practice counseling strategies that are designed to address factors that impact student learning and development. Specific topics discussed include effective communication with parents and school personnel, leadership styles, play media, and special needs children. Ethical and legal considerations specific to the practice of counseling children and adolescents in schools and educational systems are presented. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Completion of all core counseling courses or permission of the instructor.

CNS 5310. Mental Health Issues in Childhood and Adolescence

From an integrative ecological perspective that acknowledges biological, psychological, social, and cultural contextual influences and their interdependence, this course will focus on the origin and course of child and adolescent mental health issues.The course will include discussion of etiological factors of various child and adolescent DSM mental disorders; associated diagnostic criteria and assessment; contextual and relational variables that influence childrenís and adolescentsí risk and resilience; and prevention and intervention approaches/strategies. Students will learn strategies to address these issues using school and community referral resources. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Completion of all core counseling courses or permission of the instructor.

CNS 5350. The Professional School Counselor

This course emphasizes the history, philosophy, and trends in school counseling and educational systems. Students will learn the roles (e.g., leader, advocate, counselor, and consultant), functions, settings, and professional identity of the school counselor in relation to the roles of other professional and support personnel in the schools. Additional content focuses on professional organizations, preparation standards, and credentials that are relevant to the practice of school counseling. Current models of school counseling programs (e.g., American School Counselor Association [ASCA] National Model) and their integral relationship to the total educational program are highlighted. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Completion of all core counseling courses or permission of the instructor.

CNS 5360. Diagnosis and Treatment Planning

The focus of this course is on the development of counseling skills necessary for making mental health and developmental diagnoses with diverse clients. The understanding of principles and development of skills necessary for biopsychosocial case conceptualization, treatment planning, and prevention programming are emphasized.A study of the history, theories, symptoms and etiology of mental and emotional disorders, including sociocultural factors related to mental health, is provided. Students will demonstrate proficiency in using diagnostic tools and providing clinical documentation. Students are expected to critically evaluate research and practices relevant to the practice of clinical mental health counseling. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Completion of all core counseling courses or permission of the instructor.

CNS 5400. Theories of Counseling

Students in this course will be introduced to existing and emerging counseling theories that can be used as models to conceptualize clients' concerns. Students will learn about the interventions associated with each of the theories and the client populations, such as individuals or families, most appropriate for each of the interventions. The counseling theories will be critiqued from a multicultural perspective. Recurring themes, such as self-awareness, will be emphasized to assist students in consciously reflecting on their philosophy on life and its influence on their approaches to counseling. Students are expected to begin to articulate their personal models of counseling based on the information that they are exposed to in this course. A theory-to-practice approach is utilized to promote counseling effectiveness with individuals, families, and groups throughout the lifespan and across diverse populations.Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Admission to the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program or the Professional School Counseling program.

CNS 5450. The Clinical Mental Health Counselor

This course provides an understanding of the history, philosophy, and trends in clinical mental health counseling.The roles and functions, preparation standards, and professional issues of the clinical mental health counselor in a multicultural society are discussed.Students will develop an understanding of how clinical mental health counselors interact with government agencies, health care providers, and social service organizations during policy making, financing of services, advocacy for clients, and during interdisciplinary consultation.Topics specific to state, regional, and national mental health trends and issues are also addressed. Credit, 3 semester hours.PREREQ: Completion of all core counseling courses or permission of the instructor.

CNS 5500. Research and Program Evaluation

This course is designed to provide counselors with the research knowledge and skills necessary to evaluate counseling interventions and programs, inform evidence-based practices, and conduct needs assessments. The course provides an overview of statistical methods and computer-based research and analysis tools. Ethical and culturally relevant strategies for conducting and interpreting qualitative and quantitative research studies are addressed. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Admission to the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program or the Professional School Counseling program.

CNS 5550. Seminar in Professional School Counseling

This course is a seminar about the principles, procedures, and emerging trends in professional school counseling. A variety of topics that are currently addressed in the professional school counseling literature will be studied. This course is designed to examine the development, organization, administration, and evaluation of comprehensive developmental P-12 school counseling programs that promote access and equity for all students. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Completion of all core counseling courses or permission of the instructor.

CNS 5600. Assessment Practices in Counseling

This course will provide students with an understanding of current and historical perspectives on the uses of standardized and non-standardized assessment and appraisal methods, techniques, and instruments in counseling.The assessment of abilities, behaviors, symptoms, achievement, personality, interests, and other characteristics relevant to the counseling process will be addressed. Issues related to assessment including selection, statistical concepts, social and cultural factors, and ethical testing procedures will be presented. Credit, 3 semester hours.PREREQ: Admission to the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program or the Professional School Counseling program and successful completion of CNS 5500.

CNS 5700. Career Counseling and Development

This course includes an overview of career development theories and career decision-making models appropriate for a multicultural society and global economy. The course is designed to assist counselors in the processes of career development program planning, organization, implementation, administration, and evaluation. A lifespan perspective that addresses the interrelationship of work, family, culture, and historical era in career development is used to present the career-planning and decision-making interventions. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Admission to the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program or the Professional School Counseling program.

CNS 5800. Multicultural and Social Justice Counseling

This course emphasizes theories of multicultural counseling, identity development, and social justice. Students learn about multicultural and pluralistic trends, such as characteristics and concerns within and among diverse groups, nationally and internationally. Also, attitudes, beliefs, understandings, and acculturative experiences, including specific experiential learning activities designed to foster studentsí understanding of self and culturally diverse clients. The counselorsí roles in developing cultural self-awareness, promoting cultural diversity, social justice, advocacy, and other culturally supported behaviors that promote optimal wellness and growth of the human spirit, mind, or body, and counselorsí roles in eliminating biases, prejudices, and processes of intentional and unintentional oppression and discrimination are reviewed. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Admission to the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program or the Professional School Counseling program.

CNS 5850.Theory and Process of Family Counseling

This course is a study of established models and theories of family counseling, including systemic and contemporary approaches to family counseling. Each approach will be examined in terms of theoretical formulations, family development, goals of counseling, conditions for change, techniques, and strengths and weaknesses. This course also examines the impact of gender roles and culture within the practice of family counseling. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Completion of all core counseling courses or permission of the instructor.

CNS 5870. The Family and Addiction

This course will examine the impact of chemical and process addictions on the family system.†† Coursework will focus on the integration of assessment, theory, and technique.Related sociocultural implications of assessment and treatment will be discussed. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Completion of all core counseling courses or permission of the instructor.

CNS 5900. Issues in Addictions for Counselors

The focus of the course will be on the assessment, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of substance-abuse related disorders and process addictions across the lifespan. Students will learn about the intersection of addictions issues with mental health issues from diagnostic and intervention perspectives. Current research and evidence-based practices in the treatment of addictions will be emphasized.The course will address ethical, legal, and cultural aspects of addictions counseling.Students will become familiar with practices, philosophies, and treatment modalities related to the field of addictions counseling. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of various addictions on all clinical and educational settings. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Completion of all core counseling courses or permission of the instructor.

CNS 6100. Counseling Practicum

The practicum is an introductory field placement course. The practicum experience allows for enhanced skill development and exposure to professional and ethical practices in a supervised and counseling setting. Students work with the Field Placement and Testing Coordinator to obtain field placements one semester in advance of enrollment. Students must complete a total of 100 clock hours at the field placement site. In addition to the field placement requirement, students are required to attend class for group supervision and attempt the comprehensive exam. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Completion of all core counseling courses, a minimum grade point average of 3.0, and an approved field placement application. Corequisites: CNS 5060 Crisis Intervention and CNS 5900 Issues in Addictions for Counselors.

CNS 6120. Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship

The clinical mental health counseling internship is a field placement course. The field placement is required to take place in a setting appropriate to the studentís graduate counseling program of study. All placements must have approval from the program faculty the semester before enrollment. The internship experience provides opportunity for in-depth application of counseling skills and techniques.Students will demonstrate their ability to apply theory to practice. Students receive field-based supervision at their sites and university-based group supervision during class time. Students must complete a total of 300 clock hours at the field placement site during each semester of enrollment in this course. Sixty percent of the 300 clock hours must be in direct client contact each semester that the course is completed. The course is completed twice for a total of 6 credit hours and 600 clock hours. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Completion of CNS 6100 Counseling Practicum, permission of the instructor, and a minimum of a grade point average of 3.0.

CNS 6130.School Counseling Internship

The school counseling internship is a field placement course. The field placement is required to take place in a setting appropriate to the studentís graduate counseling program of study. All placements must have approval from the program faculty the semester before enrollment. The internship experience provides opportunity for in-depth application of counseling skills and techniques.Students will demonstrate their ability to apply theory to practice. Students receive field-based supervision at their sites and university-based group supervision during class time. Students must complete a total of 300 clock hours at the field placement site during each semester of enrollment in this course. Sixty percent of the 300 clock hours must be in direct client contact each semester that the course is completed. The course is completed twice for a total of 6 credit hours and 600 clock hours. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Completion of CNS 6100 Counseling Practicum, permission of the instructor, and a minimum of a grade point average of 3.0.

CNSS 5xxx. Special Topics in Counseling

This course will provide an opportunity for in‑depth exploration of advanced areas and topics of interest. May be repeated for different topics. Credit, 3 semester hours.

 

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