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Film Night

 

The UNCP History Department will continue during the 2017-2018 academic year its Film Night series, hosted and arranged by Dr. Ryan Anderson. Come watch, learn, and discuss related issues with guest speakers from the UNCP History faculty. Below are the films selected for this academic year.

 

  • November 13 at 6:00 PM — Glory (1989) — Dial 225 (doors open at 5:30 PM)
"Even the Rain" Movie Poster Dr. Chris Woolley

Dr. Chris Woolley will moderate a showing of Even the Rain (2010), an award winning drama about a pair of Spanish filmmakers who travel to Bolivia in hopes of shooting a film about Christopher Columbus’s conquest. On the one hand, this is the story of a Spanish film crew’s attempt to capture a moment of indigenous resistance to Spanish rule in the sixteenth-century Caribbean.  At the same time, the filmmakers’ story is set to the backdrop of the Cochabamba Water Wars, in which indigenous cooperatives organized successfully to resist a World Bank-imposed scheme to privatize their water. Even the Rain therefore asks us to consider the ways in which conquest and resistance continue to be central themes in the lives of many indigenous peoples long after the fall of Europe’s formal empires. This is a film about “leaderless” people navigating forces that would change their way of life in an effort to remain in control of their way of life. 

Dr. Woolley is an Assistant Professor of History who teaches a course on indigenous Latin America, as well as several on other aspects of Latin American history. He is currently revising a manuscript for publication that addresses issues related to Spanish colonialism, deforestation, and indigenous peoples.

 
 

2016-2017 Academic Year
 

  • September 19 at 5:30 PM — Glory (1989) — Dial 225 (doors open at 5:00 PM)
Glory — Movie Poster Dr. Jaime Martinez

Glory stars Denzel Washington, Matthew Broderick, and Morgan Freeman, among others. It depicts the formation and early travails and successes of the Civil War’s first all-black volunteer company: the 54th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.  The 54th’s valiant efforts in the Union assault on Fort Wagner during the summer of 1863—depicted in the film’s climatic sequence—earned them respect as fighters and encouraged the further mobilization of black troops in the Union army.  Glory interweaves a number of complementary themes, including leadership, power dynamics influenced by race, class, age, and the history of the Civil War. Ultimately, it asks that viewers consider questions of innate moral nobility and sacrifice.

Our guest speaker is Dr. Jaime Martinez, an Associate Professor of History who teaches a course on the American Civil War and is the author of Confederate Slave Impressment in the Upper South (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2013).

 

  • November 14 at 6:00 PM — Stand By Me (1986) — Dial 225 (doors open at 5:30 PM)
Stand by Me Poster Dr. Ryan Anderson

Standy by Me is an adaption of the Stephen King novella “The Body” (1982) and a story about the loss of innocence. It is set in 1959 and was released during the waning years of “Reagan’s America.” Four twelve-year-old boys set out to find a lost body and claim the notoriety of having done so. Along the way they realize none of their lives have been or will be as simple as they presume. Starring a spectacular 1980s cast highlighted by the performances of Wil Wheaton, River Phoenix, Jerry O’Connell, and Corey Feldman, Stand By Me depicts a nostalgia for a supposedly simpler time before the tumult of the 1960s by highlighting a universally accepted culture of boyhood. In doing so the movie defines how its characters begin coming of age by accepting the responsibilities American culture puts upon teenaged boys.

Our featured speaker is Dr. Ryan Anderson, an Associate Professor of History who teaches and publishes on American cultural history. He is the author of Frank Merriwell and the Fiction of All-American Boyhood: The Progressive Era Creation of the Schoolboy Sports Story (Little Rock: University of Arkansas Press, 2015).

 

  • March 16 at 6:00 PM — High Noon (1952) — Dial 225 (doors open at 5:30 PM)
High Noon Dr. Weston Cook

Dr. Weston F. Cook will moderate a viewing of the Gary Cooper western, High Noon, which also stars Grace Kelly. As its theatrical poster proclaims, this is “the story of a man too proud to run!” Retired lawman Will Kane is sought out by Frank Miller, a criminal he caught years before. Miller is returning on the noon train and Kane must run or, as it turns out, take a stand on his own. Released at the height of the Second Red Scare, this taut drama was both praised and scorned by critics at home and abroad because it spurned classic Western tropes such as epic chases, constant fights and shootouts, and a virtuous and strong-willed protagonist.  

 

Is Kane a new leader for a new day in America? Or a sign of leadership’s decline in the face of a rising Soviet menace? Come decide for yourself.

 

  • April 4 at 6:00 PM — Milk (2008) — Dial 225 (doors open at 5:30 PM)
Milk Dr. Ryan Anderson

Milk is the story of America's first openly elected official.  Starring Sean Penn, Emile Hirsch, and Josh Brolin, the biopic recounts the life and political career of Harvey Milk — a man who worked to create fairer society and has since inspired succeeding generations of human rights activism. Milk proved timely, as it was released two weeks before the 2008 California voter referendum on gay marriage was voted upon. Now, more than ever, his story is an inspiration in the polarized cultural politics of contemporary America.

Our featured speaker is Dr. Ryan Anderson, an Associate Professor of History who teaches and publishes on American cultural history. He is the author of Frank Merriwell and the Fiction of All-American Boyhood: The Progressive Era Creation of the Schoolboy Sports Story (Little Rock: University of Arkansas Press, 2015).