Native American Resource Center

Publications for Sale

For more information on our publication series, please contact us.  If you would like to purchase one of our publications send a check or money order in the amount of the publication plus $3.00 (shipping fee) with the title of the publication to:

The Native American Resource Center
UNC Pembroke
PO Box 1510
Pembroke, North Carolina  28372-1510



Waccamaw Indian People of South Carolina [DVD] (2012)
Price: $16.05
Produced by:

  • The Museum of the Native American Resource Center
    UNC Pembroke
  • The Waccamaw Indian People of South Carolina


Waccamaw Indian People of South Carolina talk about their history and culture -- about what it means to them to be Waccamaw. Their words, interwoven with the images of past and present, reveal their struggles, and their sense of community, and the pride they feel or their traditions.



Our People: The Coharie [DVD] (2011)
Price: $15.00
Produced by:

  • The Museum of the Native American Resource Center
    UNC Pembroke
  • NC Commission of Indian Affairs


Coharie people talk about their history and culture - about their sense of what it means to be Coharie. Their words, interwoven with images of past and present, revel the primary landmarks of Coharie identity: tradition, faith, community and education.



Our People: The Lumbee [DVD] (2009)
Price: $15.00
Produced by:

  • The Museum of the Native American Resource Center
    UNC Pembroke
  • NC Commission of Indian Affairs


Lumbee people talk about their history and culture - about their sense of what it means to be Lumbee. Their words, interwoven with images of past and present, reveal the primary landmarks of Lumbee identity: tradition, faith, community and education.



 


Our People: Occaneechi Band of Saponi Nation [DVD] (2008)
Price: $15.00
Produced by:

  • The Museum of the Native American Resource Center
    UNC Pembroke
  • NC Commission of Indian Affairs


Occaneechi people talk about their history and culture -- about their sense of what it means to be Occaneechi. Their words, interwoven with images of past and present, reveal the primary landmarks of Occaneechi identity: tradition, faith, community and education.



Listen To The Drum: A Closer Look at American Indian Powwow Music [DVD] (2008)
Price: $12.84

Produced by:

  • The Museum of the Native American Resource Center
    UNC Pembroke


The heartbeat of every powwow is the drum. This heartbeat influences the daily lives of the people who sing and dance with it. In this video members of Stoney Creek Singers discuss the history, meaning and relationships surrounding the powwow durm.



Dancing in the Gardens of the Lord [DVD] (2007)
Price: $12.00

Produced by:

  • The Museum of the Native American Resource Center
    UNC Pembroke

There's an old Chippewa word 'pawa-tam' that means "I dream often." Our modern word powwow comes from the same Algonkian origin, which means "to dream." The faces at a powwow still reflect that original meaning -- the dream of ceremony, of healing; of tradition and the old ways; the dream of family; the dream of creation. And each year as summer heat takes its last effect, and autumn comes on with its cool evenings, the drum-beat echoes through the pine, oak and sweetgum, urging us to gather at the dance arena, closer to the dream, closer to 'pawa-tam.' For some, powwow is a time to renew old acquaintances, enjoy old friends and make new friends who share the dream. For others, it is a time of family; seeing the elders dance alongside the young ones, watching the young ones grow in the old ways. Powwow is a renewal of life in the circle, of oneness with creation and the Creator. At a powwow we connect past, present and future -- a very real dream, a tangible vision, bonding us all to Mother Earth and to each other. In the ancient words of the Aztec: "Now my friends, please hear; it is the song of a dream. Each spring the gold young corn gives us life; the ripened corn gives us refreshment. To know that the hearts of our friends are true is to put around us a necklace of precious stones."


Our People: The Sappony [DVD] (2007)
Price: $15.00
Produced by:

  • The Museum of the Native American Resource Center
    UNC Pembroke
  • NC Commission of Indian Affairs

Sappony people talk about their history and culture -- about their sense of what it means to them to be Sappony. Their words, interwoven with images of past and present, reveal the primary landmarks of Sappony identity: Tradition, faith, community and education.


In The Heart of Tradition: The Eight State-Recognized Tribes of North Carolina and the NC Commission of Indian Affairs [DVD] (2005)
Price: $15.00
Produced by:

  • The Museum of the Native American Resource Center
    UNC Pembroke
  • NC Commission of Indian Affairs

"Haliwa-Sapini.
Meherrin.
Coharie.
Waccamaw-Siouan.
Lumbee.
Eastern Band of Cherokee.
Occaneechi Band of Saponi.
Sappony.
The NC Commission of Indian Affairs.
We are The People -- the First Nations --
the eight state-recognized tribes
of North Carolina.
We have always been here.
And we are still strong, and growing.
Our ancestors left us
with a flame in our hearts --
to keep alive what they taught us.
with the Creator's help, we will.
We live in the Heart of Tradition."


A Healing Faith: Lumbee Oral Traditions in the Face of Breast Cancer [DVD] Remastered 2009 )original video 2005) - no longer available in VHS format
Price: $15.00
Produced by:

  • The Museum of the Native American Resource Center
    UNC Pembroke

"Each time I tell somebody
about my cancer, I don't know
what seed I'm planting in that person's
life..."

Lumbee women tell their stories of breast cancer survivorship. These women see their illness and healing as part of a greater purpose. They share their stories as hope for the Indian community, and to raise awareness fo how faith and medicine are both part of healing.


River Spirits: A Collection of Lumbee Writings (2003)
edited by Stanley Knick
Price: $21.35

How may we know what is meaningful in a culture? What is it that makes one culture distinct from another? In what ways is a culture similar to all other cultures? One way to approach answering these questions is to look at a collection of writings from the culture - by allowing poets, dramatists and storytellers to be representative voices of that culture.

Several of the stories are obviously true. Some of them probably have some fiction in them. There is humor. There is pain. There is love. There is faith. There is patriotism. There is anger. There is hope. There is pride. There is a deep sense of the past. There is a piercing sense of the present. There is an earnest sense of the future.

But in every case, a window into Lumbee culture is open. Sometimes it is a narrow opening, giving only a glimpse of what it means to be Lumbee. Sometimes it is a wide opening, folding back the curtains of history and cultural differences to bare the very soul of what it means to these writers to be alive, to be who they are, to be Lumbee.


Lumbee By Grace: Landmarks in Lumbee Identity [video] Remastered 2007 (original video 2002) -no longer avaliable in DVD format
Price: $12.84
Produced by:

  • The Museum of the Native American Resource Center
    UNC Pembroke
  • Mass Communications Department
    UNC Pembroke
  • Media Integration Project
    UNC Pembroke

"Outsiders may have difficulty seeing into the currents of history which flow in our river,
in our stories, in our veins.
But we see. We know. We remain.
I am Lumbee."

Lumbee people talk about their sense of what it means to be Lumbee. Their words, interwoven with images of past and present, reveal the primary landmarks of Lumbee cultural identity: home & family; the land & the river; education & Old Main; religion & spiritually.

Running Title: 29:20 min. / Stereo / Color / Digitally Mastered


Fine In The World: Lumbee Language in Time and Place (2002)
by Walt Wolfram, Ph.D.; Clare Dannenberg, Ph.D.; Stanley Knick, Ph.D.; Linda Oxendine, Ph.D.
Price: $16.05

Few things are more symbolic of culture than language. This is no different for the Lumbee community than it is for any other community, despite the fact that the Lumbee stopped using their ancestral native American language or languages generations ago. The story of Lumbee English is a testament to the linguistic adaptability and the resiliency of the Lumbee people, who responded to the loss of their indigenous languages by shaping the English of their European invaders into a unique emblem of Lumbee identity.

In an important sense, language reflects the status of the Lumbee people, who defy conventional stereotypes while at the same time maintain a resolute sense of who they are as an Indian people. In this book, we attempt to portray Lumbee English as it has evolved in time and place. - from the book's Preface


Indian By Birth: The Lumbee Dialect [video] (2000)
Price: $12.84
Produced by:

  • North Carolina Language & Life Project, Humanities Extension / Publications
  • The Museum of the Native American Resource Center at UNC Pembroke
  • The Department of American Indian Studies at UNC Pembroke

 

"If we're anywhere in the country and hear ourselves
speak, we know exactly who we are."

Stripped of their heritage language generations ago, the Lumbee Indians of Southeastern North Carolina carved out a unique dialect of English to maintain their linguistic identity. The story of Lumbee English is a remarkable narrative of linguistic adaptability and cultural perseverance.

Running Time:  28 min / Stereo / Color / Digitally Mastered




The Lumbee In Context: Toward An Understanding (2000)
by Stanley Knick, Ph.D.
Price: $16.05

Not until very recently have researchers of Lumbee history realized that the old formula doesn't fit. In order for Lumbee history to have meaning, it must be understood within the context of the circumstances which shaped it. Stanley Knick's series of essays, The Lumbee in Context: Toward An Understanding, attempts to revise the formula. By expanding the boundaries of Lumbee history in both time and place, he uncovers new dimensions for contextualizing the story.

For example, he challenges the old notion that Lumbees are recent inhabitants (late 1700s) of Robeson County (the home of the Lumbee). Based on his own archaeological research, he contends that there has been a continuous Native American presence in the area for as much as 14,000 years. His theory of the blended tribal heritage of the Lumbee is based on evidence of the subsequent efforts of survivors to look for other tribal groups to join. This suggestion of tribal amalgamation could certainly go far in understanding the culture of the present day Lumbee.

The latter essays in this collection focus on more recent problems of the Lumbee, particularly that of full federal recognition, the challenges of self-government and tribal sovereignty and the specific issue of the Lumbee name. Evidence is cited supporting the fact that the name is much older than the 1953 legislation which officially recognized the tribe under the name Lumbee. - by Dr. Linda Oxendine, from the book's Prologue


Along The Trail: A Reader About Native Americans (1996)
by Stanley Knick, Ph.D.
Price: $16.05

The readings in this book grew out of the weekly public education column "Along the Robeson Trail," which originally appeared in the Carolina Indian Voice, and later in The Robesonian. The readings have been considerably modified, and to each have been added a glossary of important words, a list of discussion questions to be considered in the classroom (or wherever), and suggested further references on the topic.

I hope that this reader will be used as just that -- a reader. I hope that all students will be encouraged to read every selection carefully, to learn the glossary words, and to consider possible answers to the discussion questions. If this is done, the students at least will have opened the door to the vast body of knowledge about Native American prehistory, history, culture, and contemporary issues. Of course no single book, nor even any ten books, could do justice to that massive world of information. But this, at least, is a beginning.


Robeson Crossroads Archaeological Survey: Phase II Testing in Robeson County (1993)
by Stanley Knick, Ph.D.
Price: $10.70

The Native American Resource Center, University of North Carolina at Pembroke, conducted the Robeson Crossroads Archaeological Survey: Phase II, testing fifteen selected sites in Robeson County, North Carolina. The purpose of the testing was to assess the potential of these sites for further research and to evaluate their eligibility for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places.

Work at fourteen of the sites was in the form of systematic surface sampling, shovel tests (1 foot square, at 25 feet intervals) and soil augering (1 inch diameter, at 5 feet intervals, in blocks of 25 feet square). Work at the fifteenth site consisted of a single excavated test unit (5 feet square).


Robeson Trails Archaeological Survey: Reconnaissance in Robeson County (1988)
by Stanley Knick, Ph.D.
Price: $10.70

During the period between May, 1987 and July, 1988, the Native American Resource Center, University of North Carolina at Pembroke, conducted an archaeological reconnaissance of Robeson County, North Carolina. This work was partially funded under a Survey and Planning Grant from the U.S. Department of Interior, National Park Service, administered by the N.C. Division of Archives and History. This was done on a part-time basis using a crew of three to seven people. The purpose of the reconnaissance was to document archaeological sites in areas of the county which had not been previously surveyed. In addition, preliminary evaluation of specific sites was to be made.

 

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