English, Theatre & Foreign Languages

First Year Composition

UNCP’s Composition Program consists of three courses. The catalog description, objectives, and outcomes of each course are given below. 

 

ENG 0104, WRITTEN COMMUNICATION SKILLS

Course Description 
Introduces students to academic ways of reading, writing, and thinking. Students cultivate reading and writing strategies in order to understand, paraphrase, and summarize, producing several short texts. Credit, 3 semester hours (will not count toward earned hours or graduation requirements). Required for students placed into ENG 0104 and for students in the College Opportunity Program. NOTE:  Must receive “C” grade or better to progress into ENG 1050.

Course Objectives
ENG 0104 situates students in the academy and offers them tools for navigating texts. Students cultivate reading and writing strategies in order to understand, paraphrase, and summarize texts.

Outcomes
By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • practice reading and writing as recursive processes.
  • recognize genre differences.
  • use tools to understand texts (dictionary, index, table of contents).
  • pose relevant questions about a text’s purpose, audience, genre, and context.
  • demonstrate academic ways of thinking by writing for multiple purposes, which will include annotation, note-taking, paraphrase, and summary.
  • produce coherent sentences and paragraphs and follow most conventions of standard American English.

 

ENG 1050, COMPOSITION I

Course Description 
Provides students with a foundation in critical reading and writing practices by introducing different types of texts and ways of working with them; students will recognize and interpret differing perspectives and will analyze and synthesize others’ work, producing several texts of moderate length. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Placement into ENG 1050 or “C” grade or better in ENG 0104.

Course Objectives
ENG 1050 places students in a text-rich environment for the purpose of cultivating skills in critical reading and writing through analysis and synthesis. Within this context, students develop rhetorical reading and writing practices, recognizing and interpreting differing perspectives and constructing claims about texts.

Outcomes
By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • practice reading and writing as recursive processes.
  • identify a text’s purpose, audience, genre, and context.
  • recognize the elements of an argument: claims, reasoning, and assumptions.
  • demonstrate academic ways of thinking by writing for multiple purposes, which include paraphrase, summary, explication, analysis, and synthesis.
  • produce varied and sophisticated sentences and paragraphs.
  • observe differing discourse conventions, including citation formats.
  • write with academic integrity at all stages of the composing process.

(ENG 0104 outcomes are implicit in 1050.)

 

ENG 1060, COMPOSITION II

Course Description 
Builds upon the critical reading and writing practices developed in ENG 1050 and focuses on research principles and practices. Students will locate and evaluate sources; negotiate differing perspectives; synthesize and integrate sources ethically; arrive at a claim through logical reasoning; and argue the claim in rhetorically effective forms, producing several sophisticated texts.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050.

Course Objectives
English 1060 places students in a context for research by providing readings that invite students into an ongoing conversation in which they explore contesting perspectives in order to make their own contribution to that ongoing conversation.

Within this context, students will continue to cultivate rhetorical reading practices; learn to develop a research question; locate and evaluate sources; negotiate differing perspectives;  synthesize and integrate sources ethically; arrive at a claim through logical reasoning; and argue the claim in rhetorically effective forms.

Students entering 1060 should be able to:

  • paraphrase accurately
  • incorporate source material with their own ideas
  • use sources ethically
  • recognize the elements of an argument: claims, reasoning, and assumptions.

Outcomes
By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • understand that reading, writing and research are all recursive processes.
  • analyze a text’s purpose, audience, genre, and context.
  • analyze arguments by identifying claims and reasoning.
  • develop a research question that allows for the creation of their own knowledge about a subject.
  • locate credible sources in various genres appropriate to their projects using library resources and technologies.
  • draw  conclusions about their research questions by exploring and synthesizing sources.
  • articulate conclusions in rhetorically appropriate ways.

(ENG 1050 outcomes are implicit in 1060.)