American Indian Studies

Native American Speakers Series Past Speakers

Walter Echo-HawkDr. Walter Echo-Hawk
February 20, 2014
7 p.m.
University Center Annex

Walter Echo-Hawk (Pawnee) is a Native American speaker, author, and attorney. Throughout his distinguished legal career, he has worked to protect the legal, political, property, cultural, and human rights of Indian tribes and Native peoples. An articulate and experienced indigenous rights activist, Echo-Hawk delivers keynote speeches and lectures on a wide variety of indigenous topics involving Native arts and cultures, indigenous history, federal Indian law, religious freedom, environmental protection, Native American cosmology, and human rights.

Please join us for an evening with Dr. Echo-Hawk as he discusses his powerful new book, In the Light of Justice: The Rise of Human Rights in Native America & the UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which examines the proposition that Native American rights are inalienable human rights. In the Light of Justice urges Indian Country to stride toward the human rights framework created by the UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples ("UNDRIP"). Relying on atonement and forgiveness traditions, it asks the United States to heal wounds of the past and create a more just society by implementing the UNDRIP.

All members of the campus and local communities are welcome to attend this free public event, which is sponsored by the Department of American Indian Studies and the Office of Academic Affairs.

 For more information, contact Dr. Jane Haladay in AIS at haladayj@uncp.edu or 910.521.6485.

 

 Dr. Brenda ChildDr. Brenda J. Child
February 12, 2013
7:00 p.m.
Health Sciences Building 117

Brenda J. Child is an associate professor in the Department of American Studies at the University of Minnesota. She received her PhD in History at the University of Iowa and was a Katrin Lamon Fellow at the School of American Research, Santa Fe, New Mexico. Her book, Boarding School Seasons: American Indian Families, 1900-1940 (University of Nebraska, 1998), won the North American Indian Prose Award. Child was a consultant to the exhibit, “Remembering Our Indian School Days” at the Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona and co-author of the book that accompanied the exhibit, Away From Home (Heard, 2000). The exhibit will travel to the National Museum of the American Indian in 2014. Child’s newest book is Holding Our World Together: Ojibwe Women and the Survival of Community (Viking/Penguin, 2012). She is a board member of the Minnesota Historical Society and will join the Board of Trustees of the National Museum of the American Indian at the Smithsonian in 2013. At the University of Minnesota, she was a recipient of the President’s Award for Outstanding Community Service and served as Chair of the Department of American Indian Studies (2009-12). She is also part of a research group that developed a new digital humanities project, the Ojibwe People’s Dictionary, which launched as a website in 2012. Child was born on the Red Lake Ojibwe Reservation in northern Minnesota where she is a citizen. She resides with her family in Saint Paul and Bemidji, Minnesota.

This event is sponsored by the Department of American Indian Studies, Native American Resource Center, and the Office of Academic Affairs. It is free and open to the public. Dr. Child's books will be available for purchase and for her to sign at the event. For more information, contact Dr. Mary Ann Jacobs at mary.jacobs@uncp.edu.

 

Dr. Kahente Horn-MillerDr. Kahente Horn-Miller
March 19, 2013
7:00 p.m.
Native American Resource Center

Kahente Horn-Miller holds a PhD in the Humanities from Concordia University (2009). She is currently the Coordinator for the Kahnawà:ke Legislative Coordinating Commission which oversees the Community Decision Making Process, the process used by the Kahnawà:ke community to make its laws. Along with her community work, she continues to write and speak on issues relevant to Indigenous peoples in the areas of membership, citizenship, adoption, women’s issues, consensus-based decision making, governance, colonization, the Mohawk Warrior Flag, Sky Woman, and Indigenous womanism. She also teaches part-time both at Concordia University and McGill University. She is the author of journal articles and book chapters on these same topics. As a mother to four daughters and a member of the Bear Clan, she is active in the traditional community of Kahnawà:ke.

This event is sponsored by the Department of American Indian Studies, Native American Resource Center, Office of Academic Affairs, Department of History, and the Teaching and Learning Center. It is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Dr. Rose Stremlau at rose.stremlau@uncp.edu or Dr. Jane Haladay at haladayj@uncp.edu.

 

Dr. Edward ValandraDr. Edward C. Valandra
April 18, 2013
5:30 p.m.
Berea Baptist Church Fellowship Hall

Dr. Valandra, who is Sicangu Titunwan, was born and raised on the Rosebud Sioux Reservation. He received his Ph.D. in American Studies from SUNY-Buffalo and has taught at both Native and non-Native colleges and universities throughout the United States. He has served as Chair of Native Studies at the University of South Dakota, where he created the current program’s curriculum. Please join Dr. Valandra, members of the UNCP Native American Student Movement, and UNCP American Indian Studies faculty for a casual, open, respectful, and honest conversation on the state of American Indian/Native American/Native Studies programs today, 44 years after the first program began in the United States. How have these programs served Native communities and students, and what work still needs to be done?

All members of the campus and local communities are welcome to attend this free public event, which is sponsored by the Office of Academic Affairs. This event will include a potluck supper: please bring a dish to share with at least four people if possible. For more information, contact Dr. Jane Haladay in AIS at haladayj@uncp.edu (910-521-6485), or Native American Student Movement members LeAnn Strickland lrs010@bravemail.uncp.edu, Josh Lane jrl024@bravemail.uncp.edu, and Layla Locklear lrl009@bravemail.uncp.edu.

 

Winona LaDukeWinona LaDuke
September 19, 2013
7:00 p.m.
The Regional Center at COMtech

Winona LaDuke (Anishinaabe) is a graduate of Harvard and Antioch Universities. LaDuke is a founder of Honor the Earth, a national advocacy group encouraging public support and funding for native environmental groups. With Honor the Earth, she works nationally and internationally on issues of climate change, renewable energy, sustainable development, food systems and environmental justice. LaDuke is the author of a number of non-fiction titles including All Our Relations, The Winona LaDuke Reader, Recovering the Sacred: the Power of Naming and Claiming, Food is Medicine: Recovering Traditional Foods to Heal the People and her latest, The Militarization of Indian Country. She has also penned a work of fiction, Last Standing Woman, and a children's book, In the Sugarbush. LaDuke served as Ralph Nader's vice-presidential running mate on the Green Party ticket in the 1996 and 2000 presidential elections. Outspoken, engaging, and unflaggingly dedicated to matters of ecological sustainability, Winona LaDuke is a powerful speaker who inspires her audiences to action and engagement.

This event is sponsored by the Department of American Indian Studies, American Indian Women of Proud Nations Organization, and the Office of Academic Affairs. It is free and open to the public. Ms. LaDuke's books will be available for purchase and for her to sign at the event. For more information, contact Dr. Mary Ann Jacobs at mary.jacobs@uncp.edu.

 

Jim NorthrupJim Northrup, Chibenesi indigoo Ojibwemong
February 21, 2012
7:00 p.m.
University Center Annex

Jim Northrup is an Anishinaabe author, performer, and satirist from the Fond du Lac Indian reservation in Minnesota. His syndicated column, the Fond du Lac Follies, won the award for the best column by the Native American Journalists Association in 1999. He also has won awards for his autobiographies, which use humor to discuss and heal the darker sides of life, including surviving abuse at a government boarding school and PTSD from his service in the Marines during the Vietnam War. Mr. Northrup will read from his most recent book, Anishinaabe Syndicated, A View From The Rez, released in 2011, and talk about his current project, a work of fiction entitled Dirty Copper.

This event is sponsored by the Department of American Indian Studies, Office of Academic Affairs, Department of History, Office of Multicultural and Minority Affairs, Office for Community & Civic Engagement, and the Teaching and Learning Center. It is free and open to the public. Mr. Northrup's books will be available for purchase and for him to sign at the event. For more information, contact Dr. Rose Stremlau at rose.stremlau@uncp.edu.

 

Evelina Zuni LuceroEvelina Zuni Lucero
April 28, 2011
6:30 p.m.
Multicultural Center Room 129

Evelina Zuni Lucero, Isleta/Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo, is the chair of the creative writing department at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She is author of Night Star, Morning Star, which won the 1999 First Book Award for Fiction from the Native Writers Circle of the Americas. She co-edited Simon J. Ortiz: A Poetic Legacy of Indigenous Continuance (University of New Mexico Press, May 2009), a collection of interviews, creative pieces and critical essays focusing on the life and work of poet Simon J. Ortiz.

Ms. Lucero’s fiction has been published in various journals including the White Shell Water Place, Kenyon Review, Studies in American Indian Literatures, Oregon Literary Review, and others. Lucero has done writing residencies at the Mabel Dodge Luhan House in Taos, NM, and Hedgebrook Women Authoring Change program at Widhbey Island in Washington. She was a Civitella Ranieri Fellow at the Civitella Ranieri International Artist Center in Umbertide, Italy, in 2004. Lucero’s novel-in-progress, whose working title is Silicon Coyote, is the story of a Pueblo journalist/fiction writer in pursuit of his Story. The theme is the intersection of history, myth and the imagination. Ms. Lucero will be discussing her novel and reading from Silicon Coyote.

This event is sponsored by the Department of American Indian Studies and the Office of Academic Affairs. It is free and open to the public. Ms. Lucero's books will be available for purchase and for her to sign at the event. For more information, contact Dr. Jane Haladay at haladayj@uncp.edu.

 

Jack GladstoneJack Gladstone
January 20, 2010
7:00 p.m.
University Center Annex Assembly    Room

Jack Gladstone is a Native "PoetSinger" and lecturer from the Blackfeet Indian Nation of Montana. Regarded as a cultural bridge builder, he delivers programs nationally on American Indian mythology and history. In a career spanning two decades, Jack has produced fifteen critically acclaimed CD's. In 1985, Jack co-founded "Native America Speaks", an award-winning lecture series for Glacier National Park.

A former college instructor, Jack has been featured on both the Travel Channel and in USA Today magazine. Honored as a modern day warrior and bridge builder, he holds a Human Rights Award for Outstanding Community Service from Montana State University. Since 1997, Jack Gladstone has collaborated with Lloyd Maines, Grammy winning producer of the Dixie Chicks. He was also a key tribal voice providing alternate perspectives of the Lewis and Clark expedition during the recent bicentennial commemoration. In 2004, Jack narrated the Telly award winning Lewis and Clark film Confluence of Time and Courage.

This event is sponsored by the Department of American Indian Studies and the Office of Academic Affairs. It is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Dr. Jay Vest at jay.vest@uncp.edu.

 

MariJo MooreMariJo Moore
January 28, 2010
7:00 p.m.
Livermore Library

MariJo Moore, of Cherokee, Irish and Dutch ancestry, is an author/artist/poet/essayist/
lecturer/editor/anthologist/publisher and creative writing workshop facilitator. She attended Tennessee State University in Nashville, Tennessee, and Lancashire Polytechnic in Preston, England, where she received a BA in Literature. She has published extensively in a variety of genres including poetry, fiction, non-fiction essays, and she has edited several collections. Her published works include: Crow Quotes; Confessions of a Madwoman (also on CD); a novel, The Diamond Doorknob (rENEGADE pLANETS pUBLISHING); Feeding the Ancient Fires: A Collection of Writings by North Carolina American Indians; The Ice Man, The First Fire, The Cherokee Little People, (children's books); Eating Fire, Tasting Blood: Breaking the Great Silence of the American Indian Holocaust; and Birthed From Scorched Hearts: Women Respond to War.

Recently, Ms. Moore was nominated as North Carolina Poet Laureate. Ms. Moore was chosen as Minority Business Person in Services for the Year, Western NC, in 2007, was selected as Wordcrafter of the Year in 2003-2004 and 2005-06 by the Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers. The June/July issue of Native Peoples/Indian Artists magazine honored Ms. Moore as one of the top five American Indian writers of the new century in 2000. In addition, Ms. Moore has served on the New York State Council on the Arts Literature panel, the North Carolina Humanities Council, National Caucus of Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers, the board of the North Carolina Writers' Network, and the Speakers' Bureau for the North Carolina Humanities Council.

Ms. Moore resides in the mountains of western North Carolina, where she writes editorials on Indigenous issues for various publications, and was a past Poetry Editor for Rapid River Arts and Literature Journal, an Asheville based publication. Her commentaries on Native issues have aired on NPR and WBAI 99.5, First Voices /Indigenous Radio in NYC. She is founder of rENEGADE pLANETS pUBLISHING, which was chosen as Publisher of the Year by Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers in 2001. Currently, she is working on an anthology of Indigenous authors dedicated to Vine Deloria Jr, which is entitled Unraveling the Spreading Cloth of Time: Indigenous Thoughts Concerning the Universe, and a new book of short stories, titled The Boy With Tree Growing From His Ear and Other Stories.

This event is sponsored by the Department of American Indian Studies and the Office of Academic Affairs. It is free and open to the public. Ms. Moore’s books will be available for purchase and for her to sign at the event. For more information, contact Dr. Jane Haladay at haladayj@uncp.edu.

 

Joy HarjoJoy Harjo
February 18, 2010
7:00 p.m.
Moore Hall Auditorium

Joy Harjo, the incomparable “poet of music”, songwriter, sax and flute player, singer, playwright, performer and award-winning author has been performing since she left the Mvskoke Creek Tribal Nation in the late Sixties to attend high school at the Institute of American Indian Arts, where she became a member of one of the country’s first indigenous drama and dance troupes. She began writing poetry at the University of New Mexico, inspired by the call for indigenous rights in the western hemisphere, and graduated with an MFA from the famed Iowa Writers Workshop. She has received over twenty literary awards including the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Native Writers Circle of the Americas, and the William Carlos Society of America. Her seven books of poetry include
Photo: Paul Abdoo

She Had Some Horses, The Woman Who Fell From the Sky, and How We Became Human, New and Selected Poems. Born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Ms. Harjo is a member of the Mvskoke (Creek) Nation.

Ms. Harjo has also released four award-winning CD’s of original music and performances: Letter from the End of the Twentieth Century, Native Joy for Real, and She Had Some Horses. A song from her new CD, Winding Through the Milky Way, recently won a New Mexico Music Award. She has received the Eagle Spirit Achievement Award for overall contributions in the arts, from the American Indian Film Festival and a US Artists Fellowship for 2009. She performs internationally solo and with her band Joy Harjo and the Arrow Dynamics Band (for which she sings and plays saxophone and flutes).

This event is sponsored by the Department of American Indian Studies and the Office of Academic Affairs. It is free and open to the public. Ms. Harjo’s books and CDs will be available for purchase and for her to sign at the event. For more information, contact Dr. Jane Haladay at haladayj@uncp.edu.

 

Philip H. Red EaglePhilip H. Red Eagle
March 25, 2010
7:00 p.m.
Livermore Library

Philip H. Red Eagle is of Salish and Dakota ancestry and was born and raised in the Pacific Northwest. He is a published writer, canoe carver, publisher, editor, arts critic, educator, storyteller, museum curator, art gallery curator and cultural activist.

Mr. Red Eagle is one of the founders of the “Canoe Movement,” which has grown from a few canoes and fifty people in the early 1990s to over 100 canoes and over 6,000 people, annually. The success of this movement, which has come to be called Tribal Journeys, is evident not just in its rapid growth, but also in its effectiveness as a method of cultural renewal among the native peoples of the Pacific Northwest. Mr. Red Eagle has performed the canoe journey’s Copper Ring Ceremony since 1995 and makes each ring by hand. The current count is 4,500 rings given in this contract ceremony, which calls for no alcohol, no drugs, no violence and no sex during the journey. The ceremony has proven to be one of the successful elements of teaching the Canoe Way of Knowledge. The ceremony inspires both the young and old to make changes in their lives and to commit to year-round sobriety and nonviolence.

The second edition of Mr. Red Eagle’s novel, Red Earth: A Vietnam Warrior’s Journey, was published in 2007. Red Earth is written in an American style of writing called Mythical Realism. The book contains two novellas dealing primarily with the Vietnam War, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (P.T.S.D.) and the difficulties of coming home from war. Mr. Red Eagle served in the Navy from 1967 to 1976, where he attained the rank of Petty Officer First Class as a Machinists Mate (E-6). He served onboard two destroyers on two separate West-Pac deployments to Vietnam. His service included eighteen months In-Country Vietnam up the Nha Be River as a riverboat mechanic (1970-71).

Mr. Red Eagle has two bachelor degrees from the University of Washington, Seattle: a BFA in Metal Design from the School of Art (1983) and a BA in Editorial Journalism from the School of Journalism (1987).

Mr. Red Eagle’s presentation is sponsored by the Department of American Indian Studies and the Office of Academic Affairs. It is free and open to the public. Mr. Red Eagle’s book will be available for purchase and signing at the event. For more information, contact Dr. Jane Haladay at haladayj@uncp.edu.

Please join us for a screening of "Canoe Way: the Sacred Journey" with a discussion afterward with Philip Red Eagle (Dakota/Salish), founding member of the Northwest Canoe Movement. Monday, March 22, 6:30 p.m. in the Native American Resource Center.

A description of the film from its website (http://canoeway.org/) explains that: "'Canoe Way: The Sacred Journey' documents the annual Tribal Journeys of Pacific Northwest Coast Salish people. Indigenous tribes and First Nations from Oregon, Washington, Canada, and Alaska follow their ancestral pathways through the waters of Puget Sound, Inside Passage and the Northwest Coast. Families and youth reconnect with the past and each other. Ancient songs, dances, regalia, ceremonies, and language were almost lost and are coming back. Witness first hand, through the words and images of a proud people, as they share the story of the resurgence of the cedar canoe societies – and how it has opened a spiritual path of healing through tradition."

This event is sponsored by the American Indian Studies Department and is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Dr. Jane Haladay, Assistant Professor of American Indian Studies, at haladayj@uncp.edu or (910) 521-6485.

 

Dr. Malinda Maynor LoweryDr. Malinda Maynor Lowery
April 13, 2010
7:00 p.m.
Chancellor's Residence   

Dr. Malinda Maynor Lowery is an assistant professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Formerly an assistant professor of history at Harvard, Lowery is a native of North Carolina and member of the Lumbee tribe. She earned a master’s degree in documentary filmmaking from Stanford University and produced three films that explore Native American cultural identity. The last of these films was an award-winning, full-length feature about Native American sacred sites and religious freedom, In the Light of Reverence, which premiered on PBS. In 2005, she completed her Ph.D. in American History at UNC -Chapel Hill. She’s the author of the upcoming Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South: Race, Identity, and the Making of a Nation, which will be released by UNC Press in March 2010. The book deals with the internal Lumbee tribal politics and its relationship with the federal government. Along with her research, Lowery is also active in the preservation of her tribe’s heritage through the creation of an archive of Lumbee history and the staging of the outdoor drama Strike at the Wind. The daughter of Dr. Waltz and Dr. Louise C. Maynor , Malinda is the granddaughter of Foy and Bloss Cummings of the Saint Annah community and Wayne and Lucy Maynor of the Red Banks community.

This event is sponsored by the Departments of History and American Indian Studies. It is free and open to the public. Dr. Lowery’s books will be available for purchase and signing at the event. For more information, contact Dr. Rose Stremlau at rose.stremlau@uncp.edu.

 

Dr. Molly McGlennenDr. Molly McGlennen
June 7, 2010
7:00 p.m.
Native American Resource Center

Molly McGlennen was born and raised in Minneapolis, Minnesota and is of Anishinaabe and European descent. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor of English and Native American Studies at Vassar College. Holding a Ph.D. in Native American Studies and an MFA in Creative Writing, and being a poet, scholar, a new mom, and new to the East Coast, Dr. McGlennen views her poetry as a means to cross several overlapping borders in her life. Her poetry collection, Fried Fish and Flour Biscuits, is forthcoming from Salt’s Earthworks series. In this collection, she contextualizes her poems a way to preserve and translate those recipes that make up our lives, those stories that we hear in bits and pieces and never stop telling: poems, like home-cooking, continue to nourish us.

Dr. McGlennen’s scholarship and poetry have been published in journals and anthologies including Stories Through Theories/Theories Through Stories: North American Indian Writing, Storytelling, and Critique; The Salt Companion to Diane Glancy; Genocide of the Mind: New Native American Writing; Birthed From Scorched Hearts: Women Respond to War; Studies in American Indian Literatures; Shenandoah; Atlantis; Sentence; Frontiers; and To Topos Poetry International.

This event is sponsored by the Department of American Indian Studies and the Office of Academic Affairs. It is free and open to the public. Books with Dr. McGlennen’s poetry and essays will be available for purchase and for her to sign at the event. For more information, contact Dr. Jane Haladay at haladayj@uncp.edu.

 

Jesse OxendineJesse Oxendine
November 11, 2008
7:00 p.m.
Native American Resource Center

Mr. Jesse Oxendine, a Lumbee from Robeson County who now lives in Charlotte, will speak about his experience as a member of the 325th Glider Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division during WWII. Mr. Oxendine experienced combat in France, Holland, Belgium, and Germany, and he participated in the liberation of Wobbelin concentration camp. After the war, Oxendine used his GI Bill to become the first Native American pharmacist in North Carolina. These days, you'll find him cheering on UNCP football. Mr. Oxendine will show a short film about his experience at Wobbelin, and then he'll discuss with the audience. The Native American Resource Center is hosting the event and the Departments of History and American Indian Studies are co-sponsoring.

This event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Rose Stremlau at stremlau@uncp.edu.

 

Dr. Patty LoewDr. Patty Loew
November 17, 2008
7:00 p.m.
Native American Resource Center

Patty Loew, a journalist, film maker, and professor, will visit UNCP on November 17th. The Departments of American Indian Studies and History and the Native American Resource Center are sponsoring a showing of Loew's new documentary Way of the Warrior, which explores the history of Native American service in the American military. The film begins at 7 pm, and Dr. Loew will answer questions after the viewing. The event will take place in the Native American Resource Center, which is the first floor of Old Main. A member of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe, Loew teaches at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, hosts a weekly news and public affairs program that airs on Wisconsin Public Television, and has produced several documentaries and written dozens of articles on Native issues.

This event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Rose Stremlau at stremlau@uncp.edu.