American Indian Studies

2015-16 Native American Speakers Series

The series features nationally recognized American Indian scholars and artists who will delve into diverse topics and issues including Lumbee history, Native cuisine, health and wellness and Southeastern Native art.

Admission to the series is free, and it is open to the public.

Sarah DeerSarah Deer
February 16, 2016
7:00 p.m.
University Center Annex

Sarah Deer (Muskogee) is a professor of law at William Mitchell College in Saint Paul, MN. Deer is a scholar and activist whose work has focused on the systemic problems enabling sexual violence against Native women. In recognition of her leadership and accomplishments, she was awarded a MacArthur "Genius" Fellowship in 2014. She will be speaking about her work in her presentation titled, "Sovereignty of the Soul: Violence and Native Women."

Professor Deer’s scholarship focuses on the intersection of tribal law and victim’s rights. Professor Deer first worked to address violence against women beginning when she was an undergraduate in 1993. She volunteered as a rape crisis advocate while working toward her B.A. in Women’s Studies and Philosophy from the University of Kansas.  She later attended law school so that she could address the unique legal issues facing Native rape survivors, and received her J.D. with a Tribal Lawyer Certificate from the University of Kansas School of Law in 1999. 

Professor Deer’s most recent book is The Beginning and End of Rape: Confronting Sexual Violence in Native America. She is also the co-author of two textbooks on tribal law:  Introduction to Tribal Legal Studies and Tribal Criminal Law and Procedure, as well as a co-editor of Sharing Our Stories of Survival: Native Women Surviving Violence. Professor Deer has also written several articles on the intersection of tribal law, violence against women and colonialism.

She is the recipient of the 2010 Sheila Wellstone Award and was named as one of 12 Emerging Scholars Class of 2011 by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education.   In April 2011, Professor Deer received the Allied Professional Award from the United States Department of Justice for work on victims’ issues.   In September 2014, Professor Deer was named a MacArthur Fellow.  She has been quoted in the New York Times and the Guardian.  She has been a guest on NPR, Al Jazeera, and MSNBC.

This event is sponsored by UNCP’s Teaching and Learning Center and Advising Center. Refreshments will be served. For more information, contact Dr. Rose Stremlau at rose.stremlau@uncp.edu.

America Meredith
Ashley Minner
Jessica Clark

 

Native artists panel
March 31, 2016
7:00 p.m.
University Center Annex

Addressing the topic of contemporary Southeastern Native art will be America Meredith (Cherokee Nation), a painter, printmaker, educator, and editor of First American Art Magazine, Jessica Clark (Lumbee), a Robeson County painter and educator, Ashley Minner (Lumbee), a community-based visual artist and scholar from Baltimore, Md., and Terry White, a Lumbee artist from Robeson County.

This event is sponsored by PNC Bank, a member of The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc.. Other sponsors include the Department of American Indian Studies, Museum of the Southeast American Indian, the Southeast American Indian Studies Program and the Office of Academic Affairs. For more information, email ais@uncp.edu, or call 910.521.6266.

Tanaya WinderTanaya Winder
April 19, 2016
7:00 p.m.
Museum of the Southeast American Indian

Tanaya Winder is from the Southern Ute, Duckwater Shoshone, and Pyramid Lake Paiute Nations. A poet, writer, artist, and educator she writes and teaches about the expressions of love—self-love, intimate love, social love, community love, and universal love.
Winner of the 2010 A Room of Her Own Foundation’s Orlando prize in poetry, Winder has published in Cutthroat, Adobe Walls, Superstition Review, Drunkenboat and Kweli. She is co-editor of Soul Talk, Song Language with Joy Harjo (Wesleyan Univ. Press) and founding editor of As/Us: A Space for Women of the
World, a literary journal for indigenous women, founded in Albuquerque. Words Like Love is her first full length poetry collection (West End Press, 2015).

Winder holds a BA in English from Stanford University and a MFA in Creative Writing from the University of New Mexico (UNM). She guest lectures and teaches creative writing workshops at high schools and universities internationally and has taught at Stanford, University of Colorado-Boulder, and UNM, where she is adjunct professor in the Chicano/a Studies Department. Winder is Director of UC-Boulder’s Upward Bound Program, which services 103 Native American youth from 8 states, 22 high schools, and 12 reservations across the country.

An active performer and champion of her peers, Winder founded a management company for indigenous artists, Dream Warriors, which represents Mic Jordan, Tall Paul, and Frank Waln. Winder’s own poems were recently performed by the Poetic Theater Productions Presents Company in NYC.

She was Albuquerque’s Local Poets Guild Program Coordinator and has been a featured poet at Sunday Chatter, 516 Arts, on KNME’s Colores program, and as a TEDXABQ speaker for her popular talk, “Igniting Healing” (bit.ly/1IsMLuI). Read more writing and find events @tanayawinder.wordpress.com and find her on Twitter @a_girl_on_fire. Photo by Smitten & Swoon Photography.

This event is sponsored by PNC Bank, a member of The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc.. Other sponsors include the Department of American Indian Studies, Museum of the Southeast American Indian, the Southeast American Indian Studies Program and the Office of Academic Affairs. For more information, email ais@uncp.edu, or call 910.521.6266.

Past Speakers