Teacher Education Programs

Standards for Social Studies Teacher Candidates

Standards for Social Studies Teacher Candidates

 

Five social studies content standards integrate the social science disciplines and humanities concepts on which social studies educators draw to prepare students for effective citizenship.  Each of the standards articulated below assumes a global perspective on content and 21st century skills for successful teaching and learning.  Social studies teachers must demonstrate skills that include research, critical reading, and analytical writing.  They must interpret cultural and historical expressions beyond the written word and use an interdisciplinary approach in their teaching.

 

These social studies content standards provide a framework for distinct and developmentally appropriate pedagogies for student learners at the middle gradesand high school levels.

 

  1. Culture and Cultural Diversity: People, Places, and Environments

Teacher candidates who teach social studies know and can facilitate learning about how culture and culture systems function.  They are able to teach about how human beings relate to their environment and the impact of that relationship on culture.

 

  1. Time, Continuity, and Change

Teacher candidates who teach social studies know and can facilitate learning about historical periods and patterns.  They teach about diverse perspectives and sources of information that inform an understanding of the past, present,and future.

 

  1. Economic, Scientific, and Technological Development

Teacher candidates who teach social studies know and can facilitate learning about how economic forces affect individuals and communities and about the management of individual and collective resources in a global economy.  This includes the influence of science, technology, and ecologic interdependence on all aspects of human enterprise including systems such as transportation, communication, health care, warfare, agriculture, and industry. 

 

  1. Individuals, Groups, and Institutions: Their Development and Identities

Teacher candidates who teach social studies know and can facilitate learning about how individual and collective identities are shaped by groups and institutions.

 

  1. Civic Ideals and Practices: Power, Authority, and Governance

Teacher candidates who teach social studies know and can facilitate learning about the principles of democracy and human rights and about the variety of ways that governments, leaders, and citizens exercise power, develop laws, and maintain order.

 

References/Resources

Expectations of Excellence: Curriculum Standards for Social Studies, National Council for the Social Studies.  http://www.ncss.org/standards

Geography for Life, National Council for Geography Education.  http://www.ncge.org/geography/standards/

National Content Standards in Economics, National Council on Economic Education.  http://www.ncee.net/ea/standards/

National Standards for Civics and Government, Center for Civic Education.  http://www.civiced.org/index.php?page=stds

National Standards for History, National Center for History in the Schools.  http://nchs.ucla.edu/standards/toc.html

National Standards for Social Studies Teachers, National Council for the Social Studies.  http://www.ncss.org/teacherstandards/

North Carolina Standard Course of Study, North Carolina Department of Public Instruction.  http://www.ncpublicschools.org/curriculum/socialstudies/scos/

The Partnership for 21st Century Skills.  http://www.21stcenturyskills.org/

 

 

Standard 1:   Social studies teacher candidates know and can facilitate learning about how culture and culture systems function.  They are able to teach about how human beings relate to their environment and the impact of that relationship on culture.   Culture and Cultural Diversity: People, Places, and Environments

 

Social studies teacher candidates know and can facilitate learning about:

 

Middle School

  • culture and the historical and contemporary cultures of the major world regions and North Carolina 
  • the content and applications of the Five Themes of Geography
  • roles and contributions of diverse groups of people in the world and North Carolina
  • methods of cultural expression, art forms,and language
  • the connection of geography and environment to culture

 

High School

  • the definition and function of culture in societies
  • culture as an integrated whole that explains the functions and interactions of language, literature, the arts, traditions, beliefs and values, and behavior patterns
  • societal patterns that preserve and transmit culture and the dynamic relationship between cultures, environments, and societies
  • comparative and analytical approaches to examining the differences and similarities among cultures
  • specific cultural responses to persistent human issues
  • demographic and spatial patterns using various representations of the earth (maps, globes, pictures, etc.)
  • relationships between the cultural and physical characteristics of various places (landforms, climate, natural resources, population, etc.)
  • how humans relate to their environment and the consequences of that relationship on the local, regional, and global levels

 

Standard 2:   Teacher candidates who teach social studies know and can facilitate learning about historical periods and patterns.  They teach about diverse perspectives and sources of information that inform an understanding of the past, present, and future.   Time, Continuity, and Change

 

Social studies teacher candidates know and can facilitate learning about:

 

Middle School

  • key events and historical eras of world regions and North Carolina history
  • cause and effect relationships across time
  • comparative chronologies of events and patterns of change in state and world histories
  • how to analyze perspectives and sources of information (primary and secondary)
  • how history informs understanding of the present and predictions about the future

 

High School

  • significant historical periods and patterns at the local, state, national, and global levels 
  • similarities and differences, within and among cultures across time and place  
  • key concepts (chronology, cause and effect, change and continuity) used to examine how the world has changed and how it might change in the future
  • historical knowledge and the concept of time as socially influenced constructions that lead researchers to be selective in the questions they seek to answer and the evidence they use
  • the process of critical inquiry in history and the social sciences used to examine change over time and develop historical perspectives
    • identifying and framing a problem
    • using a variety of sources
    • using primary and secondary resources
    • evaluating the credibility of sources
    • putting sources into historical context
    • investigating, interpreting, and analyzing multiple viewpoints
    • clearly and effectively articulating conclusions

 

Standard 3:   Social studies teacher candidates who teach social studies know and can facilitate learning about how economic forces affect individuals and communities and about the management of individual and collective resources in a global economy.  This includes the influence of science, technology, and ecologic interdependence on all aspects of human enterprise including systems such as transportation, communication, health care, warfare, agriculture, and industry.   Economic, Scientific, and Technological Development

 

Social studies teacher candidates know and can facilitate learning about:

 

Middle School

  • the impact of industrialization, technology, and science on the economic development of North Carolina and world regions (including military developments and industrial and medical advancements)
  • the significance of agriculture for subsistence and trade
  • free enterprise; market, planned, command, and mixed economies and the mechanisms through which they function and interact
  • economic push and pull factors in relation to human migration
  • how North Carolina regions and world regions vary in terms of their access to and use of scientific and technological resources, health, education, and other human services
  • the fundamental mechanisms of individual and collective decision making that account for needs, wants, supply and demand, and resource allocation

 

High School

  • how the scarcity of resources (human, capital, technological, and natural) require economic systems that determine how goods and services will be produced and distributed
  • a comparison of economic systems (market economies, command economies, mixed economies, etc.) regarding issues of specialization, supply and demand, prices, the role of government, banks, labor, labor unions, savings, investments, and sources and uses of capital
  • the interaction among various economic systems from local to global
  • the fundamentals of personal financial literacy that develops self-directed and responsible citizens
  • the impact of scientific and technological innovation on economies and societies over the world
  • the way in which science and technology influence core societal values, beliefs, and attitudes and how societal attitudes shape scientific an technological change
  • current and historical examples of the interaction and interdependence of science, technology, and society in a variety of cultural settings

 


Standard 4:   Social studies teacher candidates who teach social studies know and can facilitate learning about how individual and collective identities are shaped by groups and institutions.   Individuals, Groups, and Institutions: Their Development and Identities

 

Social studies teacher candidates know and can facilitate learning about:

 

Middle School

  • the importance of notable and iconic figures, major religions, traditions, and philosophies
  • cultural identity development and norms of diverse groups
  • social institutions: their traditions, norms and  influence
  • the impact of stereotypes, conformity, acts of altruism, and other behaviors on individuals and groups
  • individuality and conformity and the inherent tensions between them at personal and institutional levels
  • immigration, emigration and  population distribution as factors that influence the development and identities of regions

 

High School

  • the extent to which groups and institutions meet individual needs and promote the common good
  • how such institutions as religion, education systems, social classes, families, government agencies, and legal systems develop and exert influence over both individuals and groups
  • concepts of role, status, social class, race, ethnicity, and gender shape the interactions among individuals, groups, and institutions in society
  • the tension between expressions of individuality and the efforts of groups to promote social continuity using forces such as role models, perceptions, attitudes, values, beliefs, etc.
  • the ways family, religion, gender, ethnicity, nationality, socioeconomic status and other group and cultural influences contribute to the development of a sense of self

 

Standard 5:   Social studies teacher candidates who teach social studies know and facilitate learning about the principles of democracy and human rights and about the variety of ways that governments, leaders, and citizens exercise power, develop laws, and maintain order.   Civic Ideals and Practices: Power, Authority, and Governance

 

Social studies teacher candidates know and can facilitate learning about:

 

Middle School

  • governance structures, civic duties, and functions of individuals and groups in authority
  • various forms of government that exist in world regions and levels and roles of government in North Carolina
  • rights and responsibilities of citizens
  • the relationship between civic ideals and practices that may include service learning in response to persistent problems and challenges to human well being and social justice

 

High School

  • the forms, dynamics, and uses of power
  • the purpose of government and how its powers are acquired, used, and justified
  • how power structures are created, maintained, and changed at the local, state, national, and global levels
  • basic principles of democratic constitutional government as articulated in the Founding Documents (United States Constitution, Bill of Rights, etc.)
  • representative leaders from various branches and levels of the U. S. government
  • the rights, roles, and status of individuals in relation to the general welfare
  • the rights and responsibilities of citizens on the local, state, national, and global levels including what citizens need to know and be able to do in order to participate in public policy formulation
  • how to analyze the origins and effects of public policy, and the effectiveness of public opinion in influencing and shaping public policy development and decision-making
  • comparison of the structure, ideologies, institutions, processes, etc. of different political systems throughout the world, and how different governments respond to forces of unity and diversity
  • global issues, international governing bodies, worldwide relations among nations, the role of the United States in global politics, and the global implications of civic decisions
  • how governments attempt to achieve their stated ideals at home and abroad