College of Arts & Sciences

NEWS

CAS FACULTY PUBLISH BOOK ON TEACHING SUSTAINABILITY

Jane HaladayScott HicksJanuary 2018: Jane Haladay (American Indian Studies) and Scott Hicks (English, Theatre, & Foreign Languages) have co-edited a book that foregrounds educators' personal stories. Narratives of Educating for Sustainability in Unsustainable Environments explores the challenges of teaching sustainability across a range of disciplines in difficult ecological, political, economic, and social contexts. Contributing authors teach in universities within the United States and internationally, both as tenured faculty and as adjuncts, and share a strong commitment to sustainability education even as they work to sustain their own personal and professional relationships within sometimes demoralizing, dysfunctional, or unsustainable circumstances.

 

PROFESSORS REFLECT ON CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

Mario PapparozziJanuary 2018: Mario Papparozzi and Roger Guy (Sociology & Criminal Justice) recently published an article in the Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice.  Titled “Everything That is Old Is New Again –Old Again – New Again…” the article reflects upon the changing nature of the criminal justice system. Papparozzi states, "In reflecting on what has and what has not changed in the profession over the past 40 years, I am struck by the cyclical changes that have occurred largely due to shifting political ideologies and the economy as opposed to research evidence and sound theory. It seems that the phrase 'everything that is old is new again' best describes my observations."

 

PSYCHOLOGY PROFESSOR’S DOLPHIN RESEARCH GETS NOTICED

Rachel Morrison January 2018: The content of a recent publication by Rachel Morrison (Psychology) was selected for a New York Times video and article.  Morrison and her co-author Diana Reiss (Hunter College, City University of New York) research self-awareness in dolphins. Studying juvenile bottlenosed dolphins at the National Aquarium in Baltimore over a three year period, the researchers assessed how the dolphins interacted with their reflections in a mirror. Their work demonstrates that dolphins can recognize themselves in mirrors at earlier ages than human children or chimpanzees.  

Precocious development of self-awareness in dolphins” was published in the January issue of PLOS One.  James Gorman of the New York Times produced a ScienceTake video “Dolphins Mug for the Camera in Awareness Test” and a related New York Times article “Dolphins Show Self-Recognition Earlier than Children” based upon their research.

Health Day: News for Healthier Living also covered their findings.

 

SOLO EXHIBITION OF BEGNAUD PAINTINGS

Begnaud Self Portrait

January 2018:  An exhibition of paintings by Joseph Begnaud (Art) is on view in Fayetteville, NC, through March 15th.  “Separate from the Natural World” is the first solo exhibition by the artist in the city. Paintings produced over a period of 12 years are on display, including large scale portraits and small studies. Human figures in compelling, at times theatrical, settings fill the gallery. “My paintings are dreams, not because they reference actual experiences or illustrations of a literal dream that I have had,” states Begnaud, pictured at left in an early self portrait. “Dreaming is a play of the mind that operates on a level of metaphor and emotion. References are derived from daily life but are in no way subject to reality’s normal laws.”

The exhibition, curated by Soni Martin of Fayetteville State University, is at Gallery 208 in the headquarters of Up & Coming Weekly located at 208 Rowan St. Fayetteville.

 

PAPAROZZI TO DELIVER KEYNOTE ADDRESS

January 2018: Judi Paparozzi (Sociology & Criminal Justice) has been invited to present a keynote address at a human trafficking conference in Wadesboro on January 9th. The conference is sponsored by the Corrections Family Support and Community Collaboration Program, North Carolina Families United, and the Sandhills Center (an organization providing counseling and support for substance abuse addictions and the developmentally disabled).

 

SOCIAL WORK FACULTY MEMBER APPOINTED TO NATIONAL TASKFORCE

Cindy Locklear portraitDecember 2017: Dr. Cindy Locklear (Social Work) was just appointed to the ASWB/CSWE Licensing and Regulation National Taskforce. The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) is the national agency responsible for accrediting social work educational programs; the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) is the national agency that manages the social work licensure examinations. CSWE and ASWB are the most important national bodies for social work education and licensure in the United States.

During spring 2018, the taskforce will develop a curricular guide. Dr. Locklear, along with her competency group, will be addressing social work Competency 7: Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities.

 

SPOUSE OF GRADUATE HONORED FOR STOPPING A BOMB

December 2017: John Visaggio, a explosive ordinance disposal (EOD) soldier in the 28th Ordnance Company at Fort Bragg, was honored with the Purple Heart.  Sgt. 1st Class Visaggio suffered burns to his left forearm while removing the detonation cord from a bomb in Afghanistan, August 27th. Visaggio is the husband of Brianna Visaggio, who received an MA in Social Studies Education from UNCP. 

 

GRADUATE WORKS FOR SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

Rob WardellDecember 2017: Rob Wardell, a 2014 alumnus with a Bachelor of Science degree in Applied Physics and Mathematics, summa cum laude, has accepted a position as a Museum Specialist in the Analytical Laboratories in the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.  You can get there from here! 

He began his new career this month, and among his first assignments are building two shops and supervising the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) and Raman Labs. Eventually he may supervise the Field Emission Microprobe and Scanning Electron Microscope Labs.

 

MASS COMMUNICATION FACULTY PUBLISH ON SERVICE LEARNING

 Emilia Bak HeadshotGeorge Harrison HeadshotDecember 2017: George Harrison and Emilia Bak (Mass Communication) recently published an article, “Service-Learning in a Public Relations Campaign Class: How Contingency Management Supports Positive Outcomes,” in "Partnerships: A Journal of Service Learning and Civic Engagement." The journal is hosted by UNC Greensboro and is blink peer-reviewed.

 

SOCIAL WORK STUDENT NOMINATED FOR AWARD

November 2017: Jordyn Roark (Social Work '18) is a finalist for WRAL TV's local philanthropist of the year award. She is making a real difference in the homeless community with her tireless effort, speaking at local events, publishing online, and presenting at conferences. You can vote here through December 17th.

 

NURSING FACULTY SERVES ON ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Deborah Hummer November 2017:  Deborah Hummer (Nursing) serve as a member of the Advisory Committee for Southern Regional-AHEC (SR-AHEC).  

SR-AHEC is participating in a state wide AHEC Scholars Program. Funded by grant by the federal government, the program will be designed to attract students from a variety of health care programs and disciplines. Dr. Hummer has also been accepted the opportunity serve as faculty developing the NC AHEC Scholars Program Didactic Curriculum. Mr. James Crouch, Jr. , Student Success Advocate for the Department of Nursing, also serves as a member of the Advisory Committee and will collaborate with Dr. Hummer in the AHEC Scholars Program.

 

MODEL UNITED NATIONS BRINGS HOME NINE AWARDS

 UNCP Model United Nations Team 2017

November 2017: UNCP’s Model United Nations team brought home multiple awards after competing at the Southern Regional Model United Nations Conference held in Atlanta from November 16-18.

In Atlanta the team took nine awards, exceeding the record tally taken at last year’s conference by one and making UNCP the most decorated delegation at the conference.  Included among the awards were two Outstanding Delegation Award given to Iceland and Norway, an Honorable Delegation Award given to Italy, and six outstanding individual delegate awards given to exceptional students in each of their committees.  UNCP also represented Costa Rica at the conference.  The Atlanta conference boasts 700 students from over 50 universities scattered throughout the southeast.

“It’s been difficult to contain my extreme pride for the team and what they did in Atlanta,” said faculty advisor Dr. Kevin Freeman (Political Science and Public Administration).  “Exceeding our awards count from last year’s Atlanta conference went beyond my expectations.  This might be the best team we have ever sent to a conference.”

UNCP has won over 60 individual and team awards at various conferences over the last three years.

Model United Nations emphasizes cooperative, hands-on, experiential learning that allows students to confront a range of topics with the perspective of their assigned country or organization. Through these experiences--during preparation, in committee sessions, and even in hallway caucuses--students develop an appreciation of differing viewpoints, experience the challenges of negotiation, see the rewards of cooperation, broaden their world view, and discover the human side of international relations and diplomacy.

The Model United Nations team next attends the Southern Regional Spring Conference in Charlotte April 12-14, 2018.  The Braves will represent Germany, Belarus, and Egypt.

 

UNCP HOSTS HIDDEN NO MORE TOUR

Hidden No More Graphic

November 2017:  Over 60 participants attended “Hidden No More: STEM Women of Color,” a program celebrating diversity in the sciences held on Saturday, November 11. The event was sponsored by the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center, the UNCP College of Arts and Sciences, New Student Programs, and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

Attendees heard from women, who despite challenges have made significant contributions to their fields.  Presenters included  Ann Vaughan Hammond, Peggy Vaughan, and Heather Vaughan Batten, who are the daughter, daughter-in-law, and granddaughter of Dorothy Vaughan, the NASA mathematician portrayed by Octavia Spencer in the film Hidden Figures; Dr. Jamila Simpson, the first African-American woman to receive a bachelor’s degree in Meteorology from N.C. State University; Dr. Stephani Page, creator of #BLACKandSTEM; and Dr. Freda Porter, president and CEO of Porter Scientific Inc. and enrolled member of the Lumbee Tribe. Crystal Harden, Director of Programs and Strategic Initiatives and Chief Diversity Officer for the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center, served as moderator.  Click here for more information about the presenters.

The Hidden No More Tour was organized by the  Morehead Planetarium and Science Center and is scheduled to appear at 4 other venues around the state. 

 

ALUMNA LEADS MOCK TRIAL WITH STUDENTS

Alumna McIntyre Leads Mock Trial in Criminology Class

November 3, 2017:  Robeson County Assistant District Attorney and UNCP alumna, Angelica Chavis McIntyre '10, spoke with Rudy Locklear's Criminology class. She led an engaging mock trial on property crime.

 

SAVAGE PRESENTS AT CONFERENCE

 Professor Savage with PosterNovember 2017: Tamara Savage (Social Work), who joined the UNCP faculty this fall, recently presented a poster at the American Society of Nephrology Annual Meeting & Scientific Exposition in New Orleans. The poster was titled "African American End Stage Renal Disease & Medication Adherence: What are the Effects of Everyday Discrimination?" This annual meeting is the premier international nephrology meeting.

 

BIOLOGY CLUB ASSISTS NATURE CONSERVANCY

UNCP Biology ClubOctober 2017: The UNCP Biology Club collected wiregrass seeds with the Nature Conservancy on October 22.  Joined by professor Marisol Santisteban (Biology), the club collected wiregrass on Calloway Forest Preserve. The students along with other volunteers collected 50 bags of seeds that will be used in conservation efforts establishing natural longleaf pine habitat. 

 

STUDENTS IN HOLMES LAB PRESENT AT STATE MEETING

Holmes Students at ASMOctober 2017: UNCP students attended the American Society of Microbiologists state meeting at North Carolina State University on October 21st.  Accompanied by Devang Upadhyay, six students in Dr. Holmes’ Lab presented one oral presentation and two posters.

Gabby Downs presented Comparing Solid and Liquid Fermentation Processes for the Mass Production of Entomopathogenic Nematodes.

Jeison V. Mazuera presented the poster Mass Production of the Biological Control Agent Steinernema carpocapsae in Suspension Liquid Culture.

Elijah Mebens, Nicholas Chavis, Kassie Conway, Xin Dong presented the poster Isolation and Purification of Entomopathogenic Bacteria Xenorhabdus nematophila from Larval Galleria mellonella.

The students were mentored by Devang Upadhyay, Sivanadane Mandjiny, Jeff Frederick and Leonard Holmes. Presenting papers at conferences is an important part of academic professional life and UNCP students experience this firsthand. 

 

DOLLARD CHOSEN AS TELEVISION ACADEMY FELLOW

Terence DollardOctober 13, 2017: Terence Dollard (Mass Communication) was among 25 professors selected from colleges and universities nationwide to participate in the Television Academy Foundation’s 2017 Faculty Seminar Program. During a weeklong seminar in Southern California (Nov. 6–10th), the fellows will hear from broadcast and cable networks’ programming and scheduling executives, content creators, and legal experts. They will also tour top Hollywood production facilities, observe productions underway, and meet producers. 

 

ASTRONOMER PRESENTS AT MARLBORO ACADEMY

Jose D'Arruda headshotOctober 6, 2017:  Jose D’Arruda presented “Solar System and the Universe” at the Marlboro Academy on Friday, October 6th to middle and high school students.  He talked about the history of astronomy and the universe, covering such topics as black holes, gravity, and the size of the universe. 

Dr. D’Arruda received the 2015 Outstanding Physics Award from Lowell Technological Institute, and the 2014 John L. Hubisz Award for Outstanding Service to the North Carolina Physics Teachers.  He also received the 2007 University of North Carolina’s Board of Governors’ Teaching Excellence Award among other accolades. 

 

HARDY NAMED TO STATE LICENSURE BOARD

Portrait of Veronica HardySeptember 2017.  Veronica Hardy (Social Work) was recently appointed to Governor Cooper to the North Carolina Social Work Certification and Licensure Board.  Dr. Hardy is a licensed clinical social worker and associate professor in the Department of Social Work. She joined the UNCP faculty in 2009 and holds a Ph.D. from Regent University. 

 

I.T. MAJORS INTERN AT LUMBEE RIVER EMC

Cori McMonagle Intern at LREMCSeptember 2017: Information Technology majors Cori McMonagle and William Schiegeraht began internships this fall with the Lumbee River Electric Membership Coorporation.   Working in the IT Department will provide the seniors with valuable work experience and mentoring. 

 

UNCP HOSTS SCIENCE EXPO

 Reptile at Science ExpoSeptember 2017:  Visitors to campus during Family Weekend were treated to a carnival-style Science EXPO on Saturday, Sept. 23rd.  The event was a collaboration between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center’s Impacts Program.  The program trains scientists to communicate effectively with the general public.  Faculty from the departments of Biology and Geography & Geology were joined by scientists from Chapel Hill and Fayetteville Technical Community College, reptiles from the North Carolina Aquarium, and an educational display from the Nature Conservancy’s Sandhills office. The Art Education Club led science themed arts and craft activities, while sno-cones kept the heat at bay. 

 

 

BOY SCOUT MERIT BADGE COLLEGE AT UNCP 

 Boy Scouts at Merit Badge College

September 2017: Dean Frederick welcomed boy scouts on Saturday, Sept. 23rd, to the inaugural Boy Scout Merit Badge College at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke. The scouts worked toward badges in crime prevention, pottery, geology, public health, weather, entrepreneurship, public speaking, chemistry, American heritage, and sustainability. Thanks to all the UNCP faculty and staff who helped with the event!

 

COMMEMORATING HURRICANE MATTHEW

University of North Carolina at Pembroke will host an event commemorating the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Matthew on October 5, 2017, 6-8 p.m. in the University Center Annex. Mike Sprayberry, director of North Carolina Emergency Management, will serve as keynote. The public is invited to attend.

 

SELLERS' RESEARCH MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

Patricia Seller PortraitSeptember 2017: Professor Patricia Sellers’ (Biology) research on mercury contamination has helped spur the Canadian government into addressing a long-overdue environmental injustice.  

Last June, the Canadian government announced it would earmark $85 million to clean up mercury contamination in the Wabigoon River in Ontario, Canada.  The announcement comes nearly 50 years after mercury contamination was first discovered and after generations of people of Grassy Narrows and Wabaseemoong First Nations have suffered from mercury poisoning.  The people ingested mercury by way of drinking water and consuming fish and other wildlife connected to the river. 

Patricia is part of a scientific research team, led by Dr. John Rudd, which has monitored mercury levels in the Wabigoon-English River for many years while working closely with the Grassy Narrows community.  The river was contaminated with mercury when Reed Paper’s chlor-alkali plant in Dryden, Ontario, disposed of several tons of mercury into the river during the 1960s.

In May of 2016, the team reported that the river and nearby Clay Lake appeared to continue to receive mercury, either because mercury that was trapped in sediment was being released or because mercury was being leaked from the plant itself.  The team also reported that the river could be cleaned so that mercury levels in fish would be reduced, enabling people to consume fish without risk of mercury contamination.  News reports indicate that remediation and monitoring efforts will proceed based on the team’s recommendations.

In a CBC News audio report, Patricia was interviewed about her 2015 research report on the contamination of the river and the effects of mercury on people of Grassy Narrows.  Patricia is also the lead author on a March 2017 report that documented large levels (many times the background level) of mercury downstream of the chlor-alkali plant and low concentrations upstream of the plant.  This suggests that the plant continues to leak mercury.  Large levels of mercury downstream of the plant were also correlated with high concentrations of mercury in fish downstream.

Patricia, who is a freshwater ecologist, has been on the research team for more than a decade, and she has worked as a scientific advisor for the Grassy Narrows First Nation since 2004.  She joined the UNCP Biology faculty in 2005.

 

FIELDS DISCUSSES HER ROBESON COUNTY ROOTS

Nancy Fields PortraitSeptember 2017: Nancy Strickland Fields, director of the Musuem of the Southeast American Indian, dissusses her ties to Robeson County in an Our State Magazine article by Elizabeth Leland.  Fields joined the museum in January 2017 and bringing 15 years of musuem expereince. She's worked for American Indian musuems in New Mexico, washington, D.C. and Oklahoma.

 

 UNCP TO COMPETE IN NASA SWARMATHON

UNCP 2017 Swarmathon TeamSeptember 2017: A UNCP team has been selected to compete in the 2018 NASA Swarmathon Physical Competition.  The event is a challenge to develop cooperative robotics to revolutionize space exploration. This technology promises to more effectively and efficiently locate and collect resources on the Moon or Mars.  Students will be challenged to develop search algorithms for robotic swarms. Pictured is the UNCP 2017 team, that participated in April 2017 Swarmathon. The team is coached by Dr. Mohanarajah, associate professor the the Mathematics and Computer Sciences department. 

The Third Annual Swarmathon will occur April 17-18, 2018 at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. 

More information can be found at : http://nasaswarmathon.com/

  

FACULTY RECEIVE GRANT TO STUDY CHRISTIAN ZIONISM

Motti Inbari portraitKirill Bumin portrait

September 2017:  Motti Inbari (Philosophy & Religion) and Kirill Bumin (Political Science & Public Administration), have received a $4000 Micro-Grant for the study of Christian Zionism from the Academic Engagement Network. The grant will support a student research assistant, supplies, travel to and board at conservative evangelical conferences in the United States. The conferences include an annual meeting of Christians United for Israel (CUFI), a visit to Liberty University, and possibly travel to the Southern Baptist Convention Annual Meeting in June-July 2018.

Evangelical Christianity is the largest of all religious movements in the United States. It is also known as a movement that is highly engaged in American politics, mostly identified with the Republican Party. Exit polls have shown that in the 2016 election, about 80% of all Evangelicals voted for Trump. 

Conservative Evangelists are also known for their strong support for Israel. In this research the goal is to gain a better understanding of this support by conducting surveys and focus groups. This research is intended to build knowledge about evangelical Christians/Christian Zionists and their views on a range of matters such as on Israel, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Temple Mount, settlements, and Jews in general.  We believe that the results of the research can provide very helpful data in thinking about anti-Semitism in America, and especially in the South.

 

RISE STUDENTS PRESENT RESEARCH ON CAMPUS

 Dr. Smith with RISE Students

August 25, 2017:  The Research Initiative for Scientific Enhancement (RISE) Program's annual End-of-Summer Student Research Presentations featured the work of more than 20 undergraduates (mostly biology and chemistry majors). The presenters conducted research this summer locally or out of state. Host institutions included Yale University, Miami University, the University of Maryland, and the University of California at Riverside. The RISE Program and other agencies like the National Science Foundation funded many of the projects.  The RISE Program prepares students for careers in biomedical and behavioral sciences and enhances undergraduate research in the sciences at UNCP.  Pictured above:  Dr. Rachel Smith with RISE presenters. Click here for more information on our RISE Program.

 

ALUMNI SPEAK TO CRIMINIAL JUSTICE CLASS

Detectives speak to class

August 2017, two UNCP alumni, Lieutenant James Obershea 02' and Sergeant Damien Mclean 01' of the Robeson County Sheriff's Office, took time out of their schedules to speak with Rudy Locklear's Criminology class. The detectives covered their roles in crime statistics and the Uniform Crime Reports (UCR), their investigations of homicides (murder and non-negligent manslaughter), rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny, motor vehicle theft, and arson, classified as property crime. The detectives also covered National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS).

Thanks to Lieutenant Obershea and Sergeant Mclean for giving their time to their alma mater.

 

NURSING FACULTY PUBLISHES ARTICLE

Portrait of Astrid OviedoAstrid Oviedo, Assistant Professor in Nursing, recently published an article, "The Doctrine of Deliberate Indifference: Reed vs. Krajca," in the Journal of Forensic Nursing, July/Sept 2017.  Ms. Oviedo's work is a great display of the Department of Nursing's mission: "Commitment to the tripartite roles of teaching, research, and community service that contribute to the cultural, intellectual, and social development of professional nurses in North Carolina and the nation."

 

UNCP HOSTS SUMMER ENGINEERING CAMPS!

Jeff Frederick, Laura Bottomely, Robin Cummings, Mary Beth Locklear

Summer 2017, UNC Pembroke introduced its first annual Engineering Camp Pembroke. Elementary and Middle school kids from around the region participated the day-camps from July 24 through August 8, 2017. UNC Pembroke partnered with the N.C. State College of Engineering and the Engineering Place to present the week-long camps. Campers learned in collaborative groups how engineers help society, and they experienced engineering themselves through hands-on, creative investigations and design activities. Some of the activities included a Nanobug Maze, Marshmellow Catapult, Newspaper Chair and other fun challenges.

UNCP currently offers a 3-plus-2 dual degree engineering program with N.C. State University.  Pictured above are: Jeff Frederick (Dean, College of Arts & Sciences), Dr. Laura Bottomely (Director, NC State's The Engineering Place), Chancellor Robin Cummings, and Mary Beth Locklear (Director, Office for Regional Initiatives, who sponsored UNCP's Engineering Camps).

For more on the camps, click here.  And check out this video on our 3-plus-2 dual degree.

 

TALK BY INTERNATIONAL SCHOLAR

Wu's Presentation

Professor Xianhua Wu visiting from Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology (NUIST), Nanjing, China, presented a talk on Friday, July 21, 2017.  He first spoke about his institution, NUIST, and its School of Economics & Management. He then presented his research on climate change and disaster risk analysis: economics of disasters, statistical methods in risk assessments, and environmental policies. 

Dr. Wu was a visiting scholar at UNC Pembroke in 2010 and he is now Dean of the School of Economics & Management at NUIST. 

 

PAPAROZZI SPEAKS AT "SEND A COP" EVENT

Paparozzi and DorlandJuly 15, 2017: Mario Paparozzi (Professor & Chair, Sociology & Criminal Justice) was guest speaker at the “Send a Cop to College” event in Wilmington. The annual fundraiser was sponsored by the Wilmington Police Recreation Association, a non-profit, and benefits its scholarship program. The event was hosted by UNCP graduate Sgt. Warren Kennedy (Ret.), who received a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies with a criminal justice concentration. Pictured above are Dr. Paparozzi and Retired Senior Parole Officer Bryan Dorland.